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BestSelf 2018 Kennedy B., Tiffany Dufu, Alicia Menendez, Rachel Simmons, Francesca G.

On May 5 at Southern Methodist University, Dallas Women’s Foundation hosted more than 300 middle school and high school girls at the annual #BestSelf leadership event. A program of Dallas Women’s Foundation’s Leadership Initiative, #BestSelf helped build future leaders by empowering young girls to be their best selves through programs that teach them (and adults) about themselves, how to build stronger relationships, healthy approaches to conflict, and how to use their voices as they pursue gender equality in school, in life and in society. Throughout the event, girls took leadership roles in making announcements and leading the panel discussions. The Foundation’s Leadership Initiative is committed to advancing and increasing the number of women and girls in leadership.

 

During the panel discussion, the participants heard from three keynote speakers who answered questions from the two student moderators about friendships, gossip, failure and embracing one’s gifts and talents to be their best self.

 

Rachel Simmons, author of Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives, and the New York Times best-sellers Odd Girl Out and The Curse of the Good Girl, gave this advice: “Everyone has a purpose, and you have to figure it out, and then the crazy goes down.”

 

Tiffany Dufu, named to Fast Company’s League of Extraordinary Women and co-founder and CEO of THE CRU, gave this advice: “All the things I used to get teased for when I was young are now all my super powers.”

 

Alicia Menendez, journalist, multimedia storyteller and named “Broadcast Journalism’s New Gladiator” by Elle, a “Content Queen” by Marie Claire, and “Ms. Millennial” by The Washington Post, gave this advice about failure after she received her first B+ in college: “If you don’t know how to approach something, you have to ask.” She ended up graduating with honors.

 

Throughout the day, there were dance/jam sessions where girls danced, people bingo to encourage girls to meet new friends, social media photo opportunities and door prizes.

 

Menendez’ breakout session, Likeability, took a critical look at what people gain by striving to be well-liked, what that can cost them, and what they might gain when they learn to care less.

 

Dufu’s breakout session, What I Wish I Had’ve Known When I Was Thirteen, talked about embracing what makes each girl special and surrounding herself with people who can help her to be her best version.

 

In Simmons’ breakout session, Enough As She Is, she translated the toxic messages about achievement that girls have internalized, and taught parents and educators the tools to help girls practice self-compassion, redefine success, pursue purpose, and—most importantly—let them know they are enough as they are.

 

The participants commented that the most valuable lessons they learned were “try not to care what others think about you and be yourself,” and “it’s okay to fail as you learn from your mistakes.”

 

After the sessions, the participants received a tour of SMU.

 

A special thank you to the sponsors:

Presenting Sponsor: Nancy Ann Hunt

Supporter: JCPenney

Gift in Kind Donors: Axxess, Kendra Scott, VisitDallas, Wells Fargo.

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Dallas Women's Foundation Brenda Jackson, Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner Selection Committee Co-Chair, ?and Chief Customer Officer, ?Oncor Electric Delivery Arcilia C. Acosta, CEO of Carcon Industries and founder and CEO of STL Engineers (HONOREE) Jocelyn D. Kidd, DDS, dentist (HONOREE) Cynthia Mickens Ross, communication and outreach director for Methodist Charlton Medical Center (HONOREE) Gail Turner, the “First Lady of SMU” and a dedicated civic-minded leader (HONOREE) Vanessa Bouché, Ph.D., assistant professor of Political Science at Texas Christian University (HONOREE) Brooke López, IGNITE National program facilitator (HONOREE) Caren Lock, Dallas Women's Foundation chairwoman and Regional Vice President and Associate General Counsel of TIAA Effie Dennison, Dallas Women's Foundation event co-chair and Texas Capital Bank senior vice president Jan Sharry, Dallas Women's Foundation event co-chair and Haynes and Boone partner Stephanie Jeffery, Capital One, VP of Diversity & Inclusion Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Dallas Women's Foundation president & CEO

Dallas Women’s Foundation held its Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner, presented by AT&T, on April 19 at the Omni Dallas Hotel. The Foundation honored six exceptional women: four received the Maura Women Helping Women Awards, and two received the Young Leader Award, presented by Capital One. The dinner was co-chaired by community and business leaders, Effie Dennison and Jan Sharry.

Dennison, who has received the Maura award, welcomed the sold out ballroom of 700 attendees. “I am always in awe of the great things accomplished by each year’s Maura and Young Leader Award recipients. From the outstanding work of our award recipients to our groundbreaking keynote speaker, tonight is designed to inspire and to motivate all of us to make a commitment, to do our part and to make sure that more women and girls have the opportunity to lead.” 

Sharry added her thanks to the sponsors. “As a sponsor, you are making an investment to address gender inequity.  Your contributions help level the playing field for women and girls. Very special thanks go to our presenting sponsor, AT&T.” (See sponsors at end of press release).

Brenda L. Jackson, award selection committee co-chair and Maura winner, talked about the Maura Award. “The award was established in 1978 to recognize those who have made extraordinary contributions to the success and well-being of women and girls in the North Texas region. Among the recipients are women and men who have blazed trails and made strides in various fields – from company executives and community volunteers, to those serving on corporate boards, in Congress, and even in the White House.” Then she asked all the previous Maura and Young Leader Award winners to stand and be recognized.

Jackson then introduced each Maura honoree with a video that told more about each one:

“For her work creating opportunities for more women being represented on corporate boards and in the male-dominated construction industry, and her contributions building a college to career pipeline that is changing the trajectory for thousands of young girls and women, we award Arcilia Acosta with the Maura Women Helping Women Award.”

“For her tireless contribution building a STEAM program for young girls in at-risk communities to expose them to careers where there is an underrepresentation of females, we recognize Maura Women Helping Women Award recipient Dr. Jocelyn Kidd.”

“For her role designing and delivering programs that help women find and align their lives with their true purpose, and for providing critical services for women and children in need, we celebrate Maura Women Helping Women Award recipient Cynthia Mickens Ross.”

“For her vision and wholehearted dedication to creating services and ensuring resources for the most marginalized and desperate women and girls – and her courage and determination in fighting to protect girls and women from the ravages of human trafficking, we honor and celebrate Maura Women Helping Women Award recipient Gail Turner.”

Caren Lock, Dallas Women’s Foundation board chairwoman and selection committee co-chair, and Stephanie Jeffery, vice president of diversity and inclusion at Capital One, Young Leader Award sponsor, introduced the two women under the age of 40 who are breaking barriers to help women advance in leadership.

“For exemplary efforts, tremendous courage and vision to create change for women and girls who are victims of human trafficking, we recognize Dr. Vanessa Bouché with the Young Leader Award.”

“For confidence, courage and tremendous effort in raising her voice and putting herself on the line to make change and represent her generation in politics, policy and community, we recognize Brooke López with the Young Leader Award.”

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Dallas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, added her congratulations to the honorees and thanks to the event co-chairs and sponsors. “As we reflect on this vision of equity, I want to acknowledge the role and impact of our founders and the loss of one this past year, the late and so deeply loved Vivian Castleberry.” Thompson recognized the founders in the room, and then she introduced a video. “As you can see from the video, we still have a long way to go to reach equity and equal representation in the halls of power, whether in the C-suite or in Congress. So to give you a real tangible sense of the steps we need to take in order to reach our goals, let me give you a number:  115 is the number of steps to the front door of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.”  She asked people to give at least $115 to further the Foundation’s mission.

After dinner was served, Jennifer Biry, AT&T Technology and Operations chief financial officer and Foundation board member, introduced Nina Tassler. “Nina is an author, entrepreneur, mother, philanthropist and the former chairwoman of CBS Entertainment. She also wrote a book entitled What I Told My Daughter: Lessons from Leaders on Raising the Next Generation of Empowered Women with excerpts from her interviews with notable women and the advice they gave their daughters.”

Tassler told the audience that everyone has a story worth telling. She told her life story of growing up as a daughter of Puerto Rican mother who converted to Judaism before she married, a child of a mixed marriage, and the only Jewish/Puerto Rican kid in her school.

“Throughout my life, and over the course of my career, I have been concerned with three central issues: gender equity, unconscious bias and the exploration of class in America.”

She talked about her career at CBS Entertainment and how she tried to address these three issues. “In order to create the greatest opportunity for success, we had to ensure that every individual at CBS, from executives to support staff to the hardworking people who cleaned our offices at night, were not only recognized for the hard work, but their salaries, raises and bonuses were always looked at through the lens of gender equity.”

About failure: “Each failure provides an opportunity for another success.”

About working moms: “To quote Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, ‘I’ve often said that I have had it all in my long lifetime, just not all at the same time.’ This became my mantra.”

Her closing words included a quote from the late Governor Ann Richards: “This is your life. It is the only one you get, so no excuses and no do-overs. If you can make a mistake or fail at something, you learn from it, you get over it and you move on. Your job is the be the very best person you can be and to never settle.”

Presenting Sponsor: AT&T, Inc.        

Speaker Sponsor: Catherine M. Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership

Crystal Sponsor: Capital One Bank, Haynes and Boone, LLP, Texas Capital Bank

Diamond Sponsor: Axxess, Jones Day

Emerald Sponsors:  Ellenore Baker & Julie England Art, David B. Miller Family Foundation, Ernst & Young LLP, Nancy Ann Hunt

Gold Sponsors: Archer Western, CARCON Industries, Celanese Corporation, Kaleta A. Doolin, Frito-Lay, Inc., Beverly Goulet, Brenda L. Jackson, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Jan Sharry, Major General Mary L. Saunders USAF (Ret.), Texas Instruments, U.S. Risk LLC

Media Sponsors: Dallas Business Journal, DCEO

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Ava DuVernay

Dallas Women’s Foundation has announced a blockbuster speaker for its October 30th luncheon: Ava DuVernay, writer, producer, director and distributor of independent films. The first African American female director to helm a $100 million budget feature film, DuVernay is breaking down barriers through films, such as her award-winning Selma and 13th, that address race, social justice, gender and age. Her recently released film, A Wrinkle in Time, grossed more than $116 million in its first month of release. DuVernay will be joined onstage by Michele Norris – noted American radio journalist, former National Public Radio host and director of TheRaceCard project – who will moderate a dialog.

The Foundation’s 33rd Annual Luncheon on October 30 takes place at the Hilton Anatole Hotel, with a VIP reception at 10:30 a.m. and luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Community leaders Lael Brodsky and Tricia Miller are co-chairs of the luncheon. Honorary co-chairs are Ambassador Ron Kirk and Matrice Ellis-Kirk. Ambassador Kirk was the first African American mayor of the City of Dallas, and both serve on many boards and charitable organizations.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Dallas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, said, “We are honored and thrilled to feature Ava DuVernay, one of the world’s most lauded and influential women in film, whose work has fearlessly explored racial inequity in the United States, broken new ground in family drama and brought to life a best-loved children’s classic. Just as we are inspired by her work as a writer, director and producer, so shall we be motivated by her personal story and journey as a pioneer in changing culture in Hollywood. Her conversation with Michele Norris, one of the most trusted voices in American journalism, is sure to be an unforgettable experience.”

 

The Annual Luncheon is the Foundation’s principal fundraiser in support of its work to advance women’s economic security, leadership, childcare access and healthcare in North Texas and to drive positive social and economic change for women and girls through research, advocacy and grant-making. Founded in 1985, Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world and has granted more than $37.6 million since its inception.

 

DuVernay is in production on her next film, Central Park Five, while overseeing production of the critically acclaimed drama series, Queen Sugar. She directed Selma (2014), which chronicles the historic 1965 voting rights campaign led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Her critically acclaimed feature-length documentary, 13th (2016), exploring racial inequality in the U.S. by focusing on the nation’s prison system, was released on Netflix. 13th was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary and won four Emmy Awards out of its eight nominations. Other noteworthy credits include Middle of Nowhere (2012), which earned her the Sundance Film Festival Best Director Award, I Will Follow (2010), and This Is the Life (2008). Prior to filmmaking, DuVernay worked as a marketer and publicist for 14 years. Her award-winning firm provided strategy and execution for more than 120 film and television campaigns for acclaimed directors, including Steven Spielberg, Clint Eastwood, Michael Mann and Bill Condon. She is the founder of ARRAY, a community-based distribution collective dedicated to amplifying films by people of color and women filmmakers. She was named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People” of 2017.

Michele Norris is one of the most trusted voices in American journalism. She is a former host of the National Public Radio (NPR) evening news program, All Things Considered (2002-2011), and later served as a special correspondent for that program (2013-2015). In 2015, she left NPR to focus on TheRaceCard project. She is author of The Grace of Silence (2010), a memoir.

Those interested in luncheon sponsorships or tables, which start at $5,000, should call 214.525.5311 or visit www.dallaswomensfdn.org/luncheon.

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Dallas Women's Foundation Cynthia Mickens Ross (Maura Awardee), Gail Turner (Maura Awardee), Jocelyn Kidd, DDS (Maura Awardee), Roslyn Dawson Thompson (Dallas Women’s Foundation president & CEO)

On March 13, Dallas Women’s Foundation held a patron party for the donors, supporters and honorees of its 2018 Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards. Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner Selection Committee Co-Chair Brenda Jackson hosted the illustrious group at Lakewood Country Club. The six recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner, presented by AT&T, on April 19, 2018, at the Dallas Omni Hotel.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Foundation president and CEO, welcomed everyone. “This year’s keynote speaker, Nina Tassler, is the former CBS Entertainment chairwoman and author of What I Told My Daughter – a thoughtful collection of advice and counsel from powerful and diverse women. Tassler will not only share what she told her daughter, but also her experiences leading CBS entertainment as the most watched network for 12 years, while bringing women as the main focal point of many shows she helped develop.”

 

Then, she introduced the co-chairs, Effie Dennison of Texas Capital Bank, and former Maura awardee, and Jan Sharry of Haynes and Boone.  

 

Sharry thanked the top sponsors. “Because of you, Dallas Women’s Foundation is able to invest in leadership opportunities for women and girls in North Texas:

Presenting Sponsor: AT&T     
Speaker Sponsor: Catherine M. Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership

Young Leader Award Sponsor: Capital One

Crystal Sponsor: Haynes and Boone, Texas Capital Bank

Diamond Sponsor: AXXESS

Media Sponsors: Dallas Business Journal, DCEO

Emerald Sponsors:  Ellenore Baker & Julie England; Ernst & Young; Nancy Ann Hunt; Jones Day.”

 

Dennison introduced the exceptional women receiving the 2018 awards. She said, “The Maura Women Helping Women Award is considered one of the most prestigious, and this year’s recipients are deeply deserving of this honor.” The Maura Awardees are:

 

Arcilia C. Acosta, first in her family to graduate college, today is CEO of Carcon Industries and founder and CEO of STL Engineers. She has transformed the male-dominated field of construction, while serving as a mentor to many women.

 

Dr. Jocelyn D. Kidd, an outstanding dentist who has served as a mentor to women dentists, led The Links Dallas Chapter’s STEAM Academy for girls and continues to be a leader in the dental industry for mentorship of women and community service.

 

Cynthia Mickens Ross, communication and outreach director for Methodist Charlton Medical Center, is also the founder of a 12-week spiritual and personal development course entitled Path-Way to Purpose. She is the senior pastor of Path-Way to Life Center of Hope Church in Hutchins, Texas, and also founded the Path-Way to Purpose Residential Housing program that provides free, safe and supportive housing for women and children.

 

Gail Turner, the “First Lady of SMU” and a dedicated civic-minded leader in our community, volunteers with several nonprofits that serve the needs of women. She is a founding member of New Friends New Life, an organization that serves women and children who have been victimized by trafficking. She continues to be a role model for young women and helps shape education for women through her work with SMU.

 

Sharry concluded, “We are also delighted to honor two Young Leader Awardees, and are grateful to Capital One for sponsoring these awards.” The Young Leader Awardees are:

 

Dr. Vanessa Bouché, an assistant professor of Political Science at Texas Christian University, who not only teaches classes on human trafficking but inspires others to pursue empathy, understanding and justice for those who have been trafficked. She has developed extensive databases on human trafficking prosecutions in the U.S. and India and even spent a significant amount of time interviewing traffickers in federal prisons.

 

Brooke López has an impressive background. At age 16, Lopez proposed a state bill and founded her nonprofit “Students of Change.” By 18, she was the youngest person ever to run for Wylie City Council. And now at 21, Lopez serves on the advisory council of IGNITE, an organization that helps women become civically engaged and eventually step into public office.

 

For those interested in purchasing tickets to the dinner, which start at $350, or a sponsorship, visit www.dallaswomensfdn.org/lfad.

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Dallas Women's Foundation

On International Women’s Day, Dallas Women’s Foundation released studies analyzing the status of women in Texas, and more specifically, in Collin, Dallas and Denton Counties. The Economic Status of Women in Texas and The Economic Status of Women in Collin, Dallas and Denton Counties, which were produced in collaboration with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, offer comprehensive insights regarding trends in employment, earnings, health insurance, education, poverty and opportunity. Despite some positive trends, Texas still needs improvement.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president and CEO, Dallas Women’s Foundation, said, “Although women in Texas have made progress, they still face inequities that prevent them from reaching their full potential. If trends continue, Texas women will not achieve equal pay until 2049. If Texas women were paid the same as men, their average annual earnings would be $7,300 higher, and their poverty rate would be reduced by 51 percent. In addition, Texas receives a C- for women’s employment and earnings and a D for women’s poverty and opportunity, grades that decreased and remained the same, respectively, since the 2004 study was conducted.”

 

She added, “Our goal with the study is to showcase the achievements women have made, and also highlight what more we must do to increase opportunities and equity for Texas women.”

 

Report Highlights:

 

Employment, Wages and Labor Force:

  • Women in Texas ages 16 and older who work full-time, year-round have median annual earnings of $37,400, which is 79.6 cents on the dollar compared with similarly-employed men.

 

  • Women’s median earnings in Dallas County are similar to the state average, $37,511, while women in Denton and Collin counties have higher annual earnings ($46,362 and $50,691, respectively.) Asian/Pacific Islander women in Collin County have the highest earnings, at $64,907 annually, and Hispanic women in Dallas County have the lowest earnings, at $25,345.

 

  • The gender wage gap is smallest in Dallas County, where women earn 92.6 cents on the dollar compared with men. The gap is much wider in Denton County at 76.2 percent, and Collin County at 70.3 percent.

 

  • Hispanic women in Collin, Dallas, and Denton counties who work full-time, year-round earn less than half of white men’s earnings; in Dallas County, Hispanic women earn just 38.4 cents for every dollar earned by white men in the county.

 

  • About 58 percent of women in Texas ages 16 and older are in the labor force. The labor force participation rate in all three counties—Collin (62.9 percent), Dallas (61.7 percent), and Denton (66.6 percent)—is higher than in the state overall. Among women, black women have the highest labor force participation rate in each county.

 

  • A growing share of employed women in Texas are in managerial or professional occupations. About 40 percent of women in Texas hold these positions, which tend to require a four-year degree and often have higher wages and employment benefits. The share of employed women in managerial or professional occupations varies by county, from a low of 37.9 percent in Dallas County to a high of 53.9 percent in Collin County. Hispanic women in Collin, Dallas, and Denton counties are the racial/ethnic group of women least likely to be employed in managerial or professional occupations.

 

Education:

  • Approximately 29 percent of women ages 25 and older in Texas have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Educational attainment among women varies widely by race and ethnicity. Less than 10 percent of Hispanic women in Dallas County have a bachelor’s or advanced degree, while over 70 percent of Asian/Pacific Islander women in Collin County have that level of education.

 

Health Insurance:

  • Seventy-eight percent of Texas’s women ages 18 to 64 have health insurance coverage, which is below the national average for women (89.4 percent). Fewer than three in four women in Dallas County have health insurance (74.0 percent), while 85.8 percent of women in Denton County and 87.7 percent of women in Collin County have coverage. In all three counties, Hispanic women are the least likely to have health insurance.

 

Women-Owned Businesses:

  • In Texas, 36.8 percent of businesses are owned by women, slightly above the national average of 35.8 percent, and up from 28.2 percent in 2007.

 

Poverty Levels:

  • Texas ranks 34th nationally for women in poverty; 17 percent of Texas women ages 18 and older live in poverty, compared with 14.2 percent of Texas men.

 

  • Smaller shares of women in Collin and Denton counties are poor (7.4 and 10.1 percent). Comparing women in the three counties, white women in Collin County have the lowest poverty rate at 5.3 percent, and Hispanic women in Dallas County have the highest poverty rate at 22.8 percent.

 

To see the full reports and release, visit https://www.dallaswomensfdn.org/statusofwomen

 

About The Status of Women in Texas:

The Status of Women in Texas is produced by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research with Dallas Women’s Foundation. International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women with a goal of accelerating gender parity.

 

About The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR):

IWPR conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings to address the needs of women, promote public dialogue, and strengthen families, communities and societies. The Institute’s research strives to give voice to the needs of women from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds across the income spectrum and to ensure that their perspectives enter the public debate on ending discrimination and inequality, improving opportunity, and increasing economic security for women and families. More information can be found at www.iwpr.org

 

About Dallas Women’s Foundation:

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Speaker Nina Tassler

Dallas Women’s Foundation has announced the recipients of its 2018 Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards, recognizing leaders who have positively impacted the lives of women and girls in the North Texas area. Award recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner, presented by AT&T, on April 19, 2018, at the Dallas Omni Hotel. The dinner, co-chaired by Effie Booker-Dennison and Janice Sharry, will include a presentation of Maura Awards to four outstanding women leaders, and Young Leader Awards, presented by Capital One, to two exceptional women under the age of 40.

 

The event’s keynote speaker is Nina Tassler, former president and chairwoman of CBS Entertainment and the highest profile Latina in network television. She is also the author of What I Told My Daughter: Lessons from Leaders on Raising the Next Generation of Empowered Women. Her appearance is sponsored in part by the Catherine M. Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership at Dallas Women’s Foundation.

 

“It is a great honor for Dallas Women’s Foundation to recognize six extraordinary leaders whose example and service to women and girls are literally awe-inspiring.  Our Maura Award recipients have dedicated their lives to creating opportunities and pathways for other women to follow; and our Young Leader Award recipients are demonstrating the impact of the next generation of women leaders in their own fields and beyond,” said Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Dallas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer. “We are also very pleased to welcome Nina Tassler as our keynote speaker. She not only achieved the highest ranks in the entertainment industry, but worked throughout her career to balance the scales for women in corporate leadership and in programming.”   

 

Maura Women Helping Women Awards:

For 39 years, the Maura Women Helping Women Award has honored courageous women and men who have catalyzed change for women and girls in North Texas. The 2018 Maura recipients will join the esteemed company of more than 200 previous honorees.  They are:

 

  • Arcilia C. Acosta

A first-generation college student, Acosta graduated from Texas Tech University and took over her father’s small business, CARCON Industries and Construction, with a vision of transforming it to meet the growth in Texas. She serves as president and CEO of CARCON Industries, a full-service construction firm based in Dallas with offices in Houston, Corpus Christi and Midland. She is also founder and CEO of STL Engineers, a geotechnical engineering and construction materials testing firm in Dallas. Acosta has more than 20 years of experience providing construction and program management for industrial, transportation, civil, educational and highway construction projects. Through her active involvement with the National and Regional Hispanic Contractors Association, the Dallas Citizens Council, bank and energy company boards, her work as Governor Greg Abbott’s appointee to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Acosta has transformed the construction industry, a mainly male-dominated industry. She also serves as a mentor to many women, and is helping build a college to career pipeline with industry leaders and universities that will serve as a national model.

 

  • Jocelyn D. Kidd, DDS

Following in her father’s footsteps, Dr. Kidd is an outstanding dentist who provides dental care to countless individuals in the Dallas community. She has held key positions with the National Dental Association, Texas Dental Association and Dallas County Dental Society, and served as a mentor in the American Association of Women Dentists Mentoring Program-Baylor College of Dentistry and in the Student National Dental Association. When she was president of The Links, Incorporated Dallas (TX) Chapter, she led efforts to establish the chapter’s Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) Academy for girls to learn more about these career paths, along with healthy lifestyles and community service. As a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., she has provided leadership, mentorship, dental screenings and oral health education at the Delta Sigma Theta World Family Days. As Dr. Kidd is a STEAM professional herself; she speaks to many young women who find it inspiring to see a mentor who resembles them. 

 

  • Dr. Cynthia Mickens Ross

Dr. Mickens Ross is a captivating speaker, teacher, coach and author. She offers words of wisdom that are thought-provoking and life-changing. Dr. Mickens Ross has authored and teaches a 12-week spiritual and personal development course entitled, Path~Way to Purpose®. Her program helps individuals discover their natural gifts, talents and abilities. Since its inception in 2002, she has led hundreds of young and mature women through the course, as her purpose is to help them discover and activate the greatness within themselves. Last year, Dr. Mickens Ross released her first book, Path~Way to Purpose Stories of Victory. She serves as director of community relations and external affairs at Methodist Charlton Medical Center, and is the senior pastor of Path~Way to Life Center of Hope Church in Hutchins, Texas. She is also founder and CEO of Cynthia Mickens Ministries, Inc. and the Path~Way to Purpose® Residential Housing program that provides free, safe and supportive housing for women and children along with other services.

 

  • Gail Turner

Gail Turner is a civic-minded leader and a member of several nonprofit organizations that serve the needs of women. She is a founding member of New Friends New Life (NFNL) that serves women and children who have been victimized by trafficking. She served as board chair for two critically defining years, and she has met with and counseled many women to leave that lifestyle. She has worked with NFNL successfully to lobby the Texas Legislature on laws that help victims of human trafficking. Turner also serves on the board of Shelter Ministries, which is comprised of Austin Street Shelter, which assists 400 homeless each night, and Genesis Women’s Shelter and Outreach. This position is demanding and challenging as the board serves two robust and complicated nonprofits together. As “First Lady of SMU,” married to SMU President Dr. Gerald Turner, she serves on the boards of the Meadows School of the Arts and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development. She is a role model for young women and helps shape education for women through her Simmons role and through her background as an educator.

Young Leader Award, presented by Capital One:

 

  • Vanessa Bouché, Ph.D.

Vanessa Bouché, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of Political Science at Texas Christian University. She has been a principal investigator on several federally-funded human trafficking projects from the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Agency for International Development. She has developed databases of human trafficking prosecutions in the U.S. and India (HumanTraffickingData.org and India.HumanTraffickingData.org); conducted public opinion research on human trafficking in the U.S., Moldova and Albania; and designed and deployed trauma informed surveys with survivors of human trafficking in the U.S. and Honduras. She also spent a significant amount of time interviewing convicted traffickers in federal prisons.  Dr. Bouché consults for a variety of organizations, including the National Opinion Research Center, Thorn and the McCain Institute. She has been an invited speaker and serves on the board of directors of Traffick911 and Arcadia. Although she has published her research in a variety of scholarly outlets, she is most passionate about inspiring others in the pursuit of empathy, understanding and justice.  She teaches a class on human trafficking in the U.S. and a study abroad on transnational human trafficking in India.  

 

  • Brooke López

A recent graduate of the University of Texas at Dallas with a bachelor’s of science in public affairs and a minor in geography, López, 21, has been interested in politics and government from an early age.  She currently serves IGNITE National as a program facilitator and is a representative on its National Communications Advisory Council. At 15, she worked with her local congresswoman to propose a state bill, and at 16, she founded the nonprofit “Student of Change.” At 18, she was the youngest person to run for Wylie City Council. At age 19, she was the youngest woman and first Latina to be appointed as a boards and commissions officer for the City of Wylie. After losing the campaign, she channeled her energy into founding the Lone Star Parity Project, a nonpartisan online publication dedicated to sharing research and stories of women in politics with the goal of bringing parity to Texas politics. She serves as a role model for many young women, including the high school ones she meets with weekly to discuss policy and politics. In 2017, she received the prestigious Gold Presidential Volunteer Service award. López plans to attend law school in fall 2018.

 

For those interested in purchasing tickets to the dinner, which start at $350, or a sponsorship, visit www.dallaswomensfdn.org/lfad.

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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Dallas Women's Foundation Dallas Women's Foundation Leadership Key Club members meet Dallas Police Chief U. Renee Hall.

Dallas Women’s Foundation Leadership Key Club members met the city’s first female Police Chief, U. Renee Hall, at an exclusive reception at Le Meridian Dallas, The Stoneleigh, on November 15. Chief Hall talked about her path to becoming the first African American female police chief and thanked the members for their work in improving the lives of women and girls in North Texas.

 

The Leadership Key Club is for those who have contributed at least $100,000 or more to the Foundation’s Unlocking Leadership Campaign. In 2013, Dallas Women’s Foundation began the Unlocking Leadership Campaign to raise $50 million to improve the future of North Texas by investing in the economic security and leadership potential of women and girls.  Funds raised are earmarked for the Foundation’s primary focus areas – women’s economic security and women’s leadership. The Economic Security Initiative aims to strengthen the economic security of 16,000 women and girls by 2021, and to date, has already helped more than 8,750 women and girls. The campaign’s Leadership Initiative aims to provide 60,000 women and girls with leadership training and opportunities, and thus far has reached nearly 28,000 women and girls through grants and programs.

 

For those interested in becoming a Leadership Key Club member and donating to the campaign, contact Shawn Wills, Dallas Women’s Foundation senior vice president of development, at swills@dallaswomensfoundation.org or 214.525.5318.

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Dallas Women's Foundation photo credit: Dallas Women's Foundation

Dallas Women’s Foundation announced that in 2017 it awarded a record $4,544,515 through 198 grants to 144 organizations benefiting women and girls. The grants included those in the Foundation’s strategic initiative areas – Economic Security, Child Care, Health Care and Leadership – as well as its annual community grants. The grants underscore the Foundation’s commitment to strengthening economic security and leadership opportunities for women and girls in the region.

 

In 2017, Dallas Women’s Foundation awarded the following:

Economic Security:                                       45%     52 grants

Health and Safety:                                       22%     31 grants

Empowering Women’s Philanthropy:           19%     62 grants

Education and Leadership:                          11%     32 grants

Women’s Issues:                                         2%       12 grants

Other:                                                         2%       9 grants

 

Using a competitive grants process, the Foundation’s volunteers and staff conduct financial reviews, site visits and program reviews to select and fund, with board approval, the most effective solutions to help women and girls.  Grants are also distributed through the Foundation’s more than 50 Donor Advised Funds.  In 2018, the Foundation is instituting a single community grants cycle, with applications due in the summer and grants awarded in the fall.

 

“We are very excited to have reached a new record of $4.5 million in grants that address the unique issues and challenges women and girls face in our community and region,” said Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Foundation president and CEO. “Our strategic investments in women’s economic security and leadership, along with our community grants, are strengthening not only individuals, but the very fabric that holds our community together.  Through the generous support and commitment of our broad base of donors, we are driving transformational change for women and girls throughout North Texas.”

 

Economic Security Initiative: 

Through its focused Economic Security Initiative, the Foundation advances opportunities for women and girls to gain education, job training and financial capability, as well as secure safe and affordable housing. In 2017, the Foundation contributed more than $750,000 that directly benefited 11,000 women and girls, and provided statewide research to inform elected officials and encourage their support of initiatives benefiting this community.

 

Child Care Access Fund:

Through its Child Care Access Fund, Dallas Women’s Foundation is making smart and sustainable investments to provide high-quality, affordable child care options for low income women and their children. In 2017, the Foundation contributed $550,000 that directly benefited 90 women-led families, while also advancing systemic changes in child care and afterschool care in Dallas and across Texas.

 

Health Care Access Fund:

Through its Health Care Access Fund, the Foundation is investing in broadening the safety net of health care for women and families in North Texas. In 2017, the Foundation contributed $972,000 in grants for health care and safety programs benefiting 16,600 women and their families.

 

Leadership Initiative:

Through its Leadership Initiative, the Foundation seeks to advance and increase the number of women in leadership positions in all sectors through grants, leadership workshops and forums, targeted research and advocacy. In 2017, the Foundation awarded $477,000 in grants and programs that impacted nearly 4,000 women and girls.

 

The Foundation is asking the community to join in its work by making a gift to support North Texas women and girls. https://www.dallaswomensfdn.org/donatenow.

 

To learn more about Dallas Women’s Foundation, its grant strategy and a full list of grantees, and ways to contribute before year-end, visit https://www.dallaswomensfdn.org/2016/why-us/current-grantee-list.

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.



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Dallas Women's Foundation Shonn Brown, event co-chair; Dr. Hope Jahren, keynote speaker; John Holt, NexBank president and CEO; Lisa Singleton, event co-chair; Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Foundation president and CEO

Dallas Women’s Foundation’s 32nd Annual Luncheon on October 20 at the Hilton Anatole – with the theme “She Who Dares”—was full of surprises and excitement. From the presentation of an inspirational video of three local women talking about their careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), to trading cards featuring 33 remarkable women leaders in STEM and an inspirational speaker, the 1,400 attendees were challenged to do more to create greater opportunities for women and girls to lead. Dr. Hope Jahren, an award-winning scientist, one of TIME Magazine’s Top 100 Influential People, best-selling author of Lab Girl and advocate for female equality in STEM, was the keynote speaker whose speech was also streamed to more than 10,000 students at 20 schools throughout Texas.

 

The luncheon is the Foundation’s principal fundraiser in support of its work to advance women’s economic security and leadership in North Texas and to drive positive social and economic change for women and girls through research, advocacy and grant-making.

As Luncheon Co-Chair Lisa Singleton said, “We are here today to advance opportunities for women and girls in our community – and beyond.  We are here to encourage investments that bring hope and possibility to girls who are daring to be leaders. There are so many obstacles and challenges that stand in the way of girls pursuing and achieving their goals – especially in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math. We are here today to change that – to remove barriers that prevent girls and women from succeeding and leading. Your investment in today’s luncheon success enables Dallas Women’s Foundation to advance opportunities for women and girls – from the classroom to the board room.”

                                                                                                                       

Luncheon Co-Chair A. Shonn Brown announced the livestreaming of Dr. Jahren’s speech to students, thanks to sponsor Lyda Hill. “Lyda invests in opportunity and innovation – and she loves supporting more women in science.  That’s why she chose to make the very generous gift that is allowing Dr. Jahren’s speech to be seen via livestream by upwards of 10,000 girls and young women at 20 different schools in Texas. Through her generosity, we are creating a ripple effect today that can transform the tomorrows for girls and women in science and in society.”

 

Brown also announced a very generous matching gift from NexBank, whose President and CEO John Holt said, “NexBank understands the urgent and immediate need to recognize and celebrate women and their achievements, as well as the need to create more opportunities for women in STEM fields and in every field.  That’s why we’re offering a matching dollar-for-dollar gift of up to $100,000 to help your contributions go farther. Our hope is that this matching gift will not only encourage support, but also challenge and inspire other Dallas-area businesses to increase their investment in programs that benefit women and girls in our community.”

By the day’s end, the She Dares campaign had garnered more than $80,000.

 

The Foundation created and gave each attendee a pack of the STEM trading cards, graciously sponsored by American Airlines. The women scientists, engineers, technologists and mathematicians featured on the cards demonstrate the impact of women leaders today in the STEM fields – and serve as real role models to inspire girls and young women to pursue their dreams.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Foundation president & CEO, said, “Shonn and Lisa together are a force of nature – and not only are they formidable fundraisers, they are two of the strongest and best advocates for our mission. They live it and breathe it – and that’s what has made this luncheon so very special:  their commitment…and their families’…to ensuring an equitable society where girls and women are full participants.”

 

Thompson then greeted the students at the 20 schools watching the livestream and introduced Dr. Jahren. “Hope Jahren epitomizes She Who Dares. Award-winning scientist, best-selling author, one of Time’s Top 100 Most Influential People in the world –who also has written over 75 peer reviewed publications, earned three Fulbrights and has three Labs named after her at three universities. A geochemist and geobiologist at the University of Oslo, she studies living and fossil organisms and how they are linked to the global environment. In her spare time, her blog #hopejahrensurecanwrite is where she shares her anecdotes about the interactions between men and women in academia. She is a powerful and creative advocate in removing negative stereotypes of women and girls in science.”

 

Dr. Jahren’s speech, entitled “The Magic of Roots, Leaves and Everything in Between” focused on how plants are similar to humans. “Plants are just as alive as we are.” She recounted that from a young age: “I don’t remember a time when I didn’t want to be a scientist.” She showed a day in her life through photos of her lab, and she read an excerpt from her best-selling book, Lab Girl, about her early days learning from her father who taught science at a community college. Her fond memories included fixing broken equipment and having free-rein in the lab to learn. It was a poignant and emotional moment as she added that she lost her father last year. Her closing remarks were powerful: “I never let the opinions of men about my capabilities deter me from my goal, because he best man I knew thought I could do it (be a scientist).”

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation Board Chair Caren Lock thanked Dr. Jahren for a moving and inspirational speech and thanked everyone for coming.

 

A special thanks to the many sponsors.

 

She Dares Sponsor ($100,000)

NexBank

Platinum Sponsors ($50,000)
U.S. Trust
Lyda Hill

 

Speaker Sponsors

Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Speaker Endowment Fund at Dallas Women's Foundation

Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt

 

Crystal Sponsors ($25,000)

American Airlines

The Men and Women of Hunt Consolidated, Inc.
Texas Instruments

Young Women’s Preparatory Network

         

Diamond Sponsors ($15,000)

EY
FedEx Office
Freeman
Jones Day

Kimberly-Clark                                

 

Media Sponsors

Dallas Business Journal

D CEO

My Sweet Charity

 

Emerald Sponsors ($10,000)

AT&T, Inc.

Ellenore and Kirk Baker/Carter Financial Mgmt

Barings Multifamily Capital LLC

Lucy and Henry Billingsley

Cecilia G. Boone

Chatham Hill Investment Partnership

Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt

Ashlee and Chris Kleinert

Paula and Ron Parker

Service King Collision Repair

Betty and Steve Suellentrop

Toyota

 

Gold Sponsors ($5,000)

AdvoCare International LP

Bank of Texas

Baron & Blue Foundation

Phyllis F. Bernstein

Brunswick Group

Nancy P. Carlson

Serena Simmons Connelly

Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Rex W. Thompson

Dr Pepper Snapple Group

Cindy Engles and Dodee Crockett

The Episcopal School of Dallas

Patricia W. Fagadau

Amy L. Fikes

Frost Bank

Sheila Gallagher and Kay Winzenried

Greenhill School and The Hockaday School

The Hart Group, Inc.

Haynes and Boone, LLP

Al G. Hill, Jr.

Trish Houck and Lyssa Jenkens

Jane and Michael Hurst

JLL

Locke Lord

Lottye and Bobby Lyle

Lynn Pinker Cox & Hurst

Mankoff Family Foundation

Alice and Erle Nye

Parish Episcopal School

PepsiCo

Sewell Automotive Companies

Sidley Austin LLP

Julia Simon and Mary Kay

Southwest Airlines

Sue Spellman

Tabani Family Foundation

Tolleson Wealth Management

Trinity Industries, Inc.

Donna M. Wilhelm

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to advance women’s economic security and women’s leadership through research, grantmaking and advocacy. The Foundation’s work improves education and quality of life, gives voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivates women leaders for the future. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn or Twitter.

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Dallas Women's Foundation Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Dallas Women's Foundation president and CEO; Lisa Singleton, DWF co-chair and director at Brunswick Group; A. Shonn Brown, DWF co-chair and partner at Lynn Pinker Cox Hurst; Caren K. Lock, DWF board chair and Regional Vice President and Associate General Counsel of TIAA

On September 14, Dallas Women’s Foundation held a patron party to thank its generous sponsors who have contributed to the 32nd Annual Luncheon set for October 20 at the Hilton Anatole Hotel. Dr. Hope Jahren, award-winning scientist, best-selling author of Lab Girl, advocate for female equality in STEM and one of TIME Magazine’s Top 100 Influential People, will be the keynote speaker.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Foundation president & CEO, said, “Dr. Jahren is an internationally recognized scientist whose compelling story inspires young women and girls to meet and overcome the challenges of pursuing careers in the STEM fields.  We are thrilled to announce that her speech at the luncheon will be livestreamed to 20 schools across the region and state, thanks to the generous support of Lyda Hill.” She also personally thanked Ellenore Knight Baker for her service as the 2015-2017 board chair and Caren K. Lock as the new 2017-2018 board chair.

 

A. Shonn Brown, luncheon co-chair, said, “About 20 years ago, a Dallas Women’s Foundation board member invited me to the luncheon where I learned about the tremendous work that the Foundation does.  So, I am extremely honored to co-chair this luncheon with Lisa Singleton to help continue that work.” She then thanked all the sponsors to date:

 

Platinum Sponsor:  U. S. Trust; Livestream Sponsor: Lyda Hill; Speaker Sponsors: Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Speaker Endowment Fund, Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt; Crystal Sponsors: American Airlines, The Men and Women of Hunt Consolidated, Texas Instruments, Young Women’s Preparatory Network; Diamond Sponsors: EY, Freeman, Jones Day, Kimberly Clark Corporation, PepsiCo; Media Sponsors: Dallas Business Journal, DCEO, My Sweet Charity; Emerald Sponsors: AT&T, Ellenore and Kirk Baker/Carter Financial Management, Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Cecilia and Garrett Boone, Chatham Hill Investment Partnership, FC Dallas/Model Behaviors - Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Ashlee & Chris Kleinert, Paula & Ron Parker, Service King Collision Repair, Betty & Steve Suellentrop, Toyota; School Partners: Cristo Rey Dallas College Prep, Episcopal School of Dallas, Greenhill School, The Hockaday School, KIPP Dallas – Fort Worth, The Parish Episcopal School, Texas Woman’s University, The University of Texas at Dallas, Young Women’s Preparatory Network.

 

Lisa Singleton, luncheon co-chair, said, “As a Foundation board member for many years, I’ve seen the positive impact that the grants have on women and girls in the community through its ripple effect, and this luncheon is important to us raising these funds. That said, we’re on track to set record fundraising goals with the luncheon, and we can’t wait to share those with you on October 20.”

 

The Annual Luncheon is the Foundation’s principal fundraiser in support of its work to advance women’s economic security and leadership in North Texas and to drive positive social and economic change for women and girls through research, advocacy and grant-making. Dallas Women’s Foundation, founded in 1985, is the largest regional women’s fund in the world and has granted more than $37.6 million since its inception.

 

Luncheon sponsorships are still available, ranging from $3,500 to $50,000; individual tickets are available at $500 to $1,000. Sponsorships are available at www.DallasWomensFdn.org/luncheon or by calling (214) 525-5311.

 

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and more than $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.