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Carrie Freeman Parsons

Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) has announced that Carrie Freeman Parsons, Chair of the Board, Freeman Company, will return for a second year as Chair of the Foundation’s Board of Directors beginning July 1, 2024. Goldman Sachs executive Cris Zertuche Wong has been named Chair-Elect of the Board, slated to succeed Parsons as Board Chair on July 1, 2025. Wong will serve a two-year term as Board Chair through June 30, 2027.

In addition, the Foundation has added new board members: Renda Mathew, Senior Vice President, Dallas Market President, Truist; and Holly Tucker, Partner, Deloitte.

Texas Women’s Foundation has named the following Board of Directors to its Executive Committee:

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

  • ·      Carrie Freeman Parsons – Chair (Chair of the Board, Freeman Company)
  • ·      Cris Zertuche Wong – Chair-Elect (Managing Director, Goldman Sachs)
  • ·      Hattie Hill – Secretary (CEO, Hattie Hill Enterprises)
  • ·      Jana Etheridge – Governance Committee Chair (Senior Vice President, Chief of Staff, Capital One)
  • ·      Lisette Mendez – Finance Committee Chair (Vice President Finance & Latin America Controller, AT&T)
  • ·      Chrysta Castañeda – Member-At-Large (President/Founder, The Castañeda Firm)
  • ·      Karen Hughes White – President and CEO, Texas Women’s Foundation

For a complete list of Board Directors, visit here.

Texas Women’s Foundation President and CEO Karen Hughes White shared, “Returning Board Chair Carrie Parsons, Chair-Elect Cris Wong and our talented Board of Directors are committed to helping Texas Women’s Foundation achieve our vision of an equitable society where women and girls can fully participate. As the Foundation nears its 40th year, there is a clear need to support and advocate for Texas women and girls and to amplify their voices. We are grateful for the active role the board will play in the fulfillment of our mission.”

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

By working with women, families and communities, Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) is building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments each year that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic/educational initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested nearly $80 million in Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides corporate, state and local decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs across the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and educational initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls not only survive but thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation/Tory Burch Candice Hill, Charmaine Tang, Tiffany Dufu, Karen Hughes White, Connie Babikian

On May 17, Tiffany Dufu, president of the Tory Burch Foundation, Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) board members and more than 100 supporters gathered at the Highland Park Village store to welcome the new TXWF President and CEO, Karen Hughes White. White started her position on April 29. Guests enjoyed breakfast, visited with each other and shopped as 20 percent of the proceeds benefited TXWF.

Dufu, who had previously spoken at Texas Women’s Foundation’s #BESTSELF conference to middle and high school girls in 2018, gave a welcome and thanked those in attendance for making strides to lift up women and girls in Texas.

White added, “I’m honored to be named the next leader of Texas Women’s Foundation that has been helping women, girls and families for nearly 40 years. A special thank you to Tory Burch and its foundation for hosting us. Thank you to all of you for your leadership in helping us achieve our mission of making Texas equitable for all.”

Some of the notable guests:

  •       Tiffany Dufu, President, Tory Burch Foundation
  •       Karen Hughes White, President and CEO, Texas Women’s Foundation
  •       Candice Hill, Host, TXWF Board Member
  •       Connie Kleinert Babikian, Host, TXWF Board Member
  •       Charmaine Tang, Host, TXWF Board Member
  •       Nakita Johnson, First Lady of Dallas, NorthFace
  •       Jennifer Sampson, CEO, United Way Dallas
  •       Ashlee Kleinert, Founder, Ruthie’s Fueled by Good
  •       Kate Rose Marquez, CEO Ascend Dallas
  •       Tracey Kozmetsky, Tory Burch Foundation Board Member
  •       Isabelle Adams, Founder and CEO, Paper for Water
  •       Felecia Burns, Austin Street Shelter
  •       Michelle Thomas, JP Morgan Chase
  •       Jane McGarry, Anchor, WFAA-TV Good Morning Texas

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation Hattie Hill, Hilda McClure, Marsha Clark, Adeeba Raheem, Cimajie Best, Heather Bellino, Jamila Thomas, Deborah Roberts, Karen Hughes White, Sakina Rasheed Foster, Veronica Torres Hazley

Texas Women’s Foundation held #BESTSELF 2024 and the Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration on April 30th at the Omni Dallas Hotel.

The day started with more than 200 middle and high school young women who attended #BESTSELF 2024, a leadership program of Texas Women’s Foundation. Capital One’s Andrella Thomas and K.J. Grassi of Dallas Mavericks’ Girls Empowered by the Mavericks program, welcomed everyone.

With the Empowered theme, the breakout sessions featured Girls Inc. talking about the “Power of Your Health;” Dallas College’s Marlonda Taylor spoke about the “Power of Your Future.” The final session included Founder and CEO of Hey Chica!, Veronica Torres Hazley (also event co-chair) speaking about the “Power of Your Voice.”

The afternoon Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration continued the Empowered theme with the honorees sharing advice and stories. After the forums, guests enjoyed a cocktail reception with European Ensemble playing stringed instruments.

At the dinner, co-chairs Sakina Rasheed Foster, Haynes and Boone, LLP partner and office managing partner, and Veronica Torres Hazley, the first Young Leader Award recipient, welcomed everyone.

They thanked the key sponsors:

Moderator: Catherine Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership at Texas Women’s Foundation

Award: Haynes Boone

Leadership Forums: Texas Capital, Vistra

Impact: The Dallas Mavericks

Media Sponsors: D CEO, Dallas Business Journal

#BESTSELF sponsors: PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers) and Capital One

For additional sponsors, visit https://txwfleadership.org/

Carrie Freeman Parsons, TXWF board chair, and Hattie Hill, TXWF executive in residence, held a fireside chat. They then welcomed Karen Hughes White, new TXWF president and CEO, to the stage for attendees to get to know her. White remarked, “I’m honored to work alongside our donors, partners, volunteers and staff to build strong women and a better world.”

Next, TXWF 2015 Young Leader recipient, Christa Brown-Sanford, spoke about connection with Brittany Barnett. Brown-Sanford asked attendees to support the Foundation.

After dinner, Cynt Marshall, The Dallas Mavericks CEO, introduced Deborah Roberts, award-winning ABC News correspondent and co-anchor of “20/20.”

Marshall moderated a conversation with Roberts drawing from her book, Lessons Learned and Cherished. Roberts beautifully illustrated the profound influence that teachers hold in shaping lives including Mrs. Hardy who believed in her. At Georgia, she visited the journalism department. “I found my calling. I was willing to try something outside my comfort zone.”

Roberts’ advice to becoming a leader: “Just own it. Somebody opened the door for me. I need to open it for others—interns, young producers. They’re waiting for someone to say you can do it.”

Marshall said, “I love that. It is called HASU: Hook a Sister Up!”

The awards presentation was the final part of the evening. Rosebud Nau, partner with Haynes Boone, spoke next. Brenda Jackson, selection committee co-chair, joined her to present the awards.

“For empowering resilience through programs, advocacy, and services for victims of domestic and dating violence, child abuse, sexual assault, and human trafficking, we proudly present Heather Bellino with the Maura Women Helping Women award.”

“For empowering authenticity by dedicating her talents to crafting and delivering executive coaching and leadership programs tailored for women, we award Marsha Clark with the Maura Women Helping Women Award.”

“For empowering representation by securing funding in support of women and economically disadvantaged students to gain knowledge and experience in construction engineering and safety, we recognize Dr. Adeeba Raheem, recipient of the Maura Women Helping Women Award.”

“For empowering mentorship by spearheading initiatives and collaborations that bolster the education and advancement of women of color, we proudly honor Jamila Thomas with the Maura Women Helping Women Award.”

“For empowering a spirit of service through a lifelong commitment to forging partnerships and initiatives that foster inclusive communities for everyone, we recognize Cimajie Best with the Young Leader Award.”

“For empowering wellness by normalizing the significance of well-being among Latina youth and single mothers, and navigating the acculturation process alongside mental health professionals, we recognize Hilda McClure with the Young Leader Award.”

Hattie Hill closed out the program and thanked everyone for coming. She told of the upcoming luncheon at the Omni Hotel on November 1 and the 2025 Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration on May 8.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Deborah Roberts

Texas Women’s Foundation has announced its Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration on April 30, 2024, at the Omni Dallas Hotel (555 S. Lamar St, Dallas, TX 75202). This day of learning, leadership and celebration starts with #BESTSELF, a half-day empowerment program for teen girls. Next, the event features Leadership Forums with the 2024 Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader recipients discussing their journey. Finally, the evening concludes with the Awards Celebration and dinner, led by Deborah Roberts, Senior National Affairs Correspondent, ABC News Co-Anchor, ABC 20/20. Cynt Marshall, Dallas Mavericks CEO, will moderate a discussion with Roberts. 

Co-chairs for the event are business leaders and Foundation supporters Sakina Rasheed Foster,Haynes and Boone, LLP Partner and Office Managing Partner, and Veronica Torres Hazley, Founder of Hey Chica! 

Foster said, “We invite you to join us on April 30th as we listen, learn and are charged with uplifting our community and our colleagues. Starting with our #BESTSELF program, our community will share its collective wisdom and empower the next generation to become the best versions of themselves and leaders in their circles of influence.”
 
Hazley added, “Our program then shifts to our honorees who will inspire you with their stories. Their roles in academia, nonprofits, leadership and business have impacted thousands of women and girls and their families to create a better community for all. Plus, we’re honored to have Deborah Roberts of ABC be a part of the conversation.”
 
Maura Women Helping Women Award:
For 45 years, the Maura Women Helping Women Award has been presented to more than 225 courageous individuals who have catalyzed change for women and girls.
 
Brenda Jackson, selection co-chair, and Carrie Freeman Parsons, TXWF chairwoman and selection co-chair, led the committee to select the following honorees:
 
Heather Bellino (Austin, TX)
Texas Advocacy Project (TAP) 
Heather Bellino is a visionary leader dedicated to transforming lives as the CEO of Texas Advocacy Project. With a commitment to serving victims of domestic and dating violence, child abuse, stalking, sexual assault and human trafficking, she leads a team that provides crucial legal services to those victims. At the heart of her leadership lies a passion for advancing the lives of women and girls. Through TAP's initiatives, Heather raises awareness about critical issues, dismantles stigma, and fosters open dialogues, driving positive systemic change.
 
Marsha Clark (Frisco, TX)
Marsha Clark & Associates
Marsha Clark has become a driving force in the realm of leadership development, change management, strategic planning, performance management, team development and executive coaching. A visionary leader, she has dedicated more than 20 years to crafting and delivering leadership development programs tailored for women. She is also an Amazon best-selling author of Embracing Your Power. Complementing her literary success, she hosts a weekly podcast titled Your Authentic Path to Powerful Leadership, accessible on MarshaClarkandAssociates.com.
 
Adeeba A. Raheem, Ph.D. (El Paso, TX)
The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)
Dr. Adeeba Raheem, UTEP associate professor of Civil Engineering, uses her academic prowess to help students. She has a multi-million dollar research portfolio with funding from U.S. federal agencies and non-profit organizations, which is directed towards supporting women and economically disadvantaged students in civil and construction engineering. For a decade, she has also been leading a construction safety training program where a large number of women representing diverse socio-economic backgrounds have been trained on occupational safety topics.
 
Jamila Thomas (Dallas, TX)
Big Brothers Big Sisters Greater Dallas
Jamila Thomas serves as senior vice president for Big Brothers Big Sisters and is responsible for establishing the strategic plan for corporate and community engagement. She also serves as an executive board member for Pipelines to Possibilities, an organization founded by four African American women judges focused on educating students on the justice system. Jamila helped establish the first Racial Equity Office in Dallas ISD and founded Cultured Consulting Group, an organization committed to the implementation of culturally responsive leadership best practices.
 
Young Leader Award: 
The Young Leader Award recognizes breakthrough leadership exhibited by a trailblazer who is achieving success in a field, initiative or sector, and creating a path of opportunity for other women to follow. This year’s recipients:
 
Cimajie Best (Dallas, TX)
Allyn Media
Cimajie Best, an account executive with Allyn Media, is a trusted advisor to clients facing public affairs challenges, public relations opportunities, political elections and landmark fundraising campaigns. As a skilled tactician in capacity building and stakeholder management, she is a strong racial equity advocate and program evaluator. Cimajie works with nonprofits, foundations, elected officials and communities to create inclusive outcomes for all parties involved. She is a staunch advocate for collaborations, partnerships and a collective impact approach to producing change.
 
Hilda H. McClure (Addison, TX)
Cannenta Center for Healing and Empowerment
Hilda McClure, COO at Cannenta Center for Healing and Empowerment and a founding board member at Cannenta Foundation, is a skilled bilingual Licensed Professional Counselor specializing in adult therapy and trauma-focused counseling. Driven by a dedication to youth well-being, she pioneered an evidence-based program for children and single mothers in residential care. Committed to community growth, she trains professionals in serving Hispanic families and navigating the acculturation process.
 
Schedule:
10:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. #BESTSELF 
With the theme “Be Empowered,” #BESTSELF is a transformative program that unites girls aged 13-16, along with their educators and allies, for a day dedicated to empowerment. The goal is to assist these girls in embracing and embodying their "best selves." Facilitated by subject-matter experts, the sessions focus on bolstering self-confidence and inspiring girls to challenge stereotypes, amplify their voices, pursue their dreams, mentor one another, and contribute to positive change for equity in schools, communities and society.
 
4:00-5:45 p.m. Leadership Forums – award recipients in a moderated conversations
 
5:45-6:30 p.m. General Reception
 
6:30-8:00 p.m.  Awards Dinner, presentation and panel discussions; Deborah Roberts serves as moderator
 
Information/Sponsorships:
To learn more about this event and purchase a sponsorship, visit https://txwfleadership.org/
 
For those interested in sponsorship, contact Joy Busch at lfad@txwf.orgjbusch@txwf.org or 917-279-6077.
 
About Texas Women’s Foundation: 
As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now
 
 
BIOS: 
 
Deborah Roberts
Deborah Roberts is an award-winning ABC News correspondent and co-anchor of the prestigious news magazine, “20/20.” A media veteran, Roberts has traveled the world for her reporting. She also serves as a substitute anchor for “Good Morning America” as well as a guest co-host on “The View.” 
 
Her in-depth coverage of current events has earned her a Peabody Award for the “20/20” special “Say Her Name: Breonna Taylor.” She has been awarded multiple Emmy® Awards for international and national coverage of world events, including the AIDS crisis in Africa and maternal mortality in Bangladesh.  
 
Roberts is the author of “Lessons Learned and Cherished: The Teacher Who Changed My Life”, a New York Times Bestseller. She’s also authored a book with her husband, Al Roker, called “Been There, Done That: Family Wisdom For Modern Times.” She currently resides in New York City with her husband. They have two children.  
 
Recipient Bios:
Heather Bellino (Austin, TX)
Texas Advocacy Project
Heather Bellino is a visionary leader dedicated to transforming lives as the CEO of Texas Advocacy Project (TAP). With a commitment to serving victims of domestic and dating violence, child abuse, sexual assault and human trafficking, Heather leads a team that provides crucial legal services to those in need.
 
Her leadership is marked by TAP's core values of innovation, integrity, courage and empowerment. Heather is constantly seeking new ways to address complex challenges in an ever-evolving world. Under her guidance, TAP has experienced remarkable growth, with the budget expanding from $900k to $5M.

Heather's influence extends beyond TAP; she's a member of Texas Council on Family Violence's Public Policy Committee and has earned an appointment to the Governor's Human Trafficking Prevention Task Force. Her expertise benefits aspiring leaders as she mentors participants in the University of Texas Executive Master in Public Leadership Program. Recognized for her expertise and advocacy, Heather is sought after for interviews by media outlets and podcasts.

At the heart of Heather's leadership lies a passion for advancing the lives of women and girls. Through TAP's initiatives, she continues to raise awareness about critical issues, dismantles stigma, and fosters open dialogues, driving positive systemic change.
 
Marsha Clark (Frisco, TX)
Marsha Clark & Associates
Marsha Clark is an independent consultant and coach who charted her entrepreneurial journey in 2000, establishing her own company. With a rich background at EDS, where she ascended from secretary to corporate officer during her 21-year tenure, Marsha brings a wealth of corporate experience to her consulting practice.
 
Over the past two decades, Marsha has become a driving force in the realm of leadership development, change management, strategic planning, performance management, team development and executive coaching. A visionary leader, she has dedicated over 20 years specifically to crafting and delivering leadership development programs tailored for women. Marsha's unique approach revolves around a comprehensive four-stage developmental framework, progressing from the personal to the interpersonal, extending to teams, and ultimately impacting entire organizations. This holistic methodology ensures nuanced growth and development, fostering the emergence of dynamic leaders. Marsha's global leadership and executive development programs have garnered worldwide recognition, solidifying her reputation as a prominent figure in the field. 
 
Marsha is not only a seasoned consultant but also an Amazon Best Selling Author in two categories for her book, Embracing Your Power. Complementing her literary success, she hosts a weekly podcast titled Your Authentic Path to Powerful Leadership, accessible on MarshaClarkandAssociates.com. Anticipated in 2024 is the release of the second installment in Marsha's 3-part book series, Expanding Your Power: A Woman’s Opportunity to Inspire Teams and Influence Organizations.

Adeeba A. Raheem, Ph.D. (El Paso, TX)

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)
Adeeba A. Raheem, Ph.D. earned her Ph.D. in Construction Management from the University of Florida and holds master’s degrees in Building Construction, Environmental Engineering and Civil Engineering. A tenured Associate Professor and Director of the Construction Safety Program at the University of Texas, El Paso, she's a member of the President’s Advisory Committee on Sustainability and Academic Innovation Committee at UTEP. Dr. Raheem has a multi-million dollar research portfolio with funding from U.S. federal agencies and non-profit organizations, which is strategically directed towards supporting women and economically disadvantaged students in the Civil and Construction Engineering programs at UTEP. 

Dr. Raheem has also been leading a construction safety training program at UTEP for the past 10 years, funded by the U.S. Department of Labor through the prestigious Susan Harwood Targeted Training Program. Under her leadership, a large number of women representing diverse socio-economic backgrounds have been trained on various occupational safety topics. The team has provided over 20,000 training hours across multiple cities in West Texas, benefiting more than 400 small businesses. 

Dr. Raheem has received several prestigious national, regional, and university awards, recognizing her unwavering commitment to inclusive teaching, applied research, and dedicated service to the local industry and community. 
 
Jamila Thomas (Dallas, TX)
Big Brothers Big Sisters Greater Dallas
Jamila Thomas is a 2019 Presidential Leadership Scholar appointed by the Presidential Centers of William J. Clinton, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Lyndon B. Johnson. She is the Founder of Women Divine, a philanthropic organization she founded 15 years ago focused on educating, inspiring, and empowering young women. Jamila now serves as the Senior Vice President for Big Brothers Big Sisters and is responsible for establishing the strategic plan for corporate and community engagement. In addition, she serves on the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Justice, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (JEDI) committee that reaches over 250 local agencies across the United States with innovative and transformational activations. 
 
Jamila also serves as an executive board member for Pipelines to Possibilities, an organization founded by four African American women judges focused on educating students on the justice system. As a result of her success in establishing the first Racial Equity Office in Dallas ISD, which focused on culturally responsive curriculum and policy development, she founded Cultured Consulting Group an organization committed to the implementation of culturally responsive leadership best practices. Jamila has been married to Brandon Thomas for 22 years, and they have two beautiful children Braylon and Jaidence. 
 
Cimajie Best (Dallas, TX)
Allyn Media
Cimajie Best is a trusted advisor to clients facing public affairs challenges, public relations opportunities, political elections and landmark fundraising campaigns. As a skilled tactician in capacity building and stakeholder management, she is a strong racial equity advocate and program evaluator. Her expertise guides clients' winning strategies with government affairs, media messaging and community outreach. Cimajie works with nonprofits, foundations, elected officials and communities to create inclusive outcomes for all parties involved.

Having launched programs for organizations such as the State Fair of Texas and the Texas Christian University, she is a staunch advocate for collaborations, partnerships, and a collective impact approach to producing lasting change in communities.

Cimajie served on the Dallas County Child Welfare board and currently serves on the boards of the Moorland Family YMCA at Oak Cliff, Healthy Future of Texas, Making it Count and Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas. She is an SVP Dana Juett Resident Alum, a Communities Foundation of Texas, Emerging Leader in Philanthropy Alum, as well as an Obama Foundation Community Leader Alum.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy & Africana Studies from Louisiana State University as well as a certificate in Social Entrepreneurship from Oxford.
 
Hilda H. McClure (Addison, TX)
Cannenta Center for Healing and Empowerment
Hilda H. McClure, COO at Cannenta Center for Healing and Empowerment and a founding board member at Cannenta Foundation, holds a master's in Counseling and a bachelor's in Early Childhood Education. As a skilled bilingual Licensed Professional Counselor, specializing in adult therapy and trauma-focused counseling, she passionately supports individuals facing mental health challenges.

Driven by a dedication to youth well-being, Hilda pioneered an evidence-based program for children and single mothers in residential care. Committed to community growth, she trains professionals in serving Hispanic families and navigating the acculturation process. Hilda shares expertise through op-ed pieces and LinkedIn articles, while her role as a professor enriches future professionals with insights into child development and psychology. Her leadership and commitment to empowering others helps shape a stronger, more resilient community.


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Dena Jackson

Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) has announced that Dena Jackson, Ph.D., interim president and CEO, will leave the organization on January 31, 2024. Fifteen years ago, she first served as a volunteer and donor, and then in 2012, she was hired as senior vice president of grants and research. She eventually became chief strategy officer responsible for research, advocacy, strategy and collaboration with stakeholders. At the request of the TXWF board, she assumed the role of interim president and CEO in spring 2023.

The Foundation has also announced that Hattie Hill will serve as Executive in Residence, effective January 1. Jackson and Hill will work together to ensure a smooth transition.

TXWF Chair of the Board Carrie Freeman Parsons said, “Dena stepped up to serve as interim CEO and provide stability. We are grateful for her service, which enabled our organization to stay focused on what is most important: supporting women and girls in Texas. During Dena’s tenure, she spearheaded our vital research Economic Issues for Women in Texas, which is celebrating its 10th year and has been the basis of our focus on the pillars that support economic stability for women in our state. Additionally, she extended TXWF’s reach into the community as well as our profile as the expert on challenges facing women and girls. We owe Dena a debt of gratitude for her tireless support of Texas Women’s Foundation.”   

Jackson said, “My last 12 years at Texas Women’s Foundation have truly been the best of my working life. It has been an honor to focus on the many ways Texas women contribute to our great state with my dedicated coworkers, grantee partners and donors.”

A long-standing supporter of the Foundation and experienced CEO of non-profits, Hattie Hill will primarily ensure ongoing organization health and help prepare the board and organization for its new CEO. Once the new CEO is hired, Hill will assist with the onboarding process and then continue her role as a valued Board and Executive Committee member. Hill is president and CEO of Hattie Hill Enterprises, Inc. She has also served as CEO of two nonprofits and is a board member of the Prosper Company.

“I’m honored to support the TXWF’s staff as they continue the work of making our communities stronger and more vibrant through grants, advocacy and leadership,” said Hill. “While the search for CEO continues, I am deeply passionate about the TXWF’s mission and I want to ensure a good starting place for the new CEO.”

Freeman Parsons added, “As an active member of our board and Executive Committee, Hattie is the perfect fit for this interim role. Her background as an HR professional will serve the organization as we search for our permanent CEO replacement.”

Texas Women’s Foundation is working with Victory Search Partners to fill the open CEO role.

About Texas Women’s Foundation: As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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The Village Giving Circle at TXWF Renee Sample, Lisa Montgomery, Rhonda Williams, Sheri Crosby Wheeler, Aliah Henry, Cheryl Bass

On November 12th at Frito Lay headquarters, The Village Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation gave $165,000 in grants to 12 nonprofit organizations whose missions support the African American community in North Texas. Since 2017, the group has distributed $1,158,000 in grants to 55 nonprofits.

Established in 2017, The Village’s mission is to honor, sustain and expand the legacy of African American women’s philanthropy by funding organizations and initiatives that positively impact the African American community in North Texas. The Village was borne out of a desire to harness the collective giving power and influence of female African American philanthropists and provide opportunities for connection.

2023 grantees are as follows:

  • Abide Women’s Health Services – Easy Access Clinic support
  • Bold Idea, Inc. – Support for ideaSpark Coding Clubs program
  • Denton Black Film Festival Institute, Inc. – 2024 “Black JOY” festival
  • H.O.P.E. Farm Inc. – Young Men’s Leadership Development program
  • I AM a Golfer Foundation – Expansion of programming pillars
  • Mercy Street Inc. – Mentoring and leadership programs support
  • Noggin Educational Foundation – STEM Strong Sisters program
  • Randolph W & Dr. Lael C. Melville Family Foundation – Health and wellness
  • The Compelling Why – Success Session (seminar) support
  • The GEMS Camp Inc – “The GEMS School Year Experience” summer camp program
  • Under 1 Roof – Funds for homeless families and individuals
  • Youth Revive Inc. – Implementation of Hope Squad at Lincoln High School

Sheri Crosby Wheeler, executive co-chair and membership management and engagement chair of The Village Giving Circle at TXWF, said, “From health and mental health services to education and homelessness, the needs are many. I’m proud that The Village Giving Circle continues to impact incredible organizations that are positively helping those who need it. I want to thank our  members and donors who have contributed to make it happen.”

Dena Jackson, interim president and CEO of Texas Women’s Foundation, said, “The collective impact of The Village Giving Circle at TXWF is impressive, and I applaud all those who have worked hard to raise funds, research the nonprofits that most need it and help out. Well done!”

Executive team includes Sheri Crosby Wheeler, Co-Chair and Membership Management & Engagement Chair; Rhonda Williams, Co-Chair and Development & Strategy Chair; Aliah Henry, Communications & PR Chair; Cheryl Bass, Finance Chair; Renee Sample, Grants Chair; Christa Brown Sanford, Legal Chair.

Co-founders and founding officers are Lisa Montgomery and Shonn Brown. Additional founding officers include Cheryl Alston, Annika Cail, Frances Cudjoe-Waters, Vera Ingram, Diane Reeves, Christa Brown Sanford and Shawn Wills.

For more information about The Village Giving Circle and grants, visit https://www.txwf.org/village-giving-circle/.

About Texas Women’s Foundation: As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) distributed a record $376,688 in grants to 24 nonprofit organizations that serve the North Texas Asian community. The event took place at Communities Foundation on November 10 with 200 in attendance. Over the past nine years, the giving circle has granted $1,721,688 to 44 nonprofits and helped impact thousands of lives with these gifts.

The nonprofit organizations and three leadership grants included the following:

  • Amphibian Productions Inc. – Program support for Spark Fest 2024
  • Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIA) - Scholarships
  • Best Buddies International, Inc. – School friendship program support
  • Bryan’s House - Social service programs for low-income Pan-Asian women with special needs children
  • CHETNA – Legal counsel, representation and mental health counseling
  • Child Care Associates – Raven’s Hope International Leadership program
  • Children’s Advocacy Center for North Texas – Operating support for translation services
  • Communities in Schools of North Texas – Support for Chin family engagement specialist
  • Dallas Asian American Historical Society Inc. – Hear Me ROAR project
  • Dallas Chinese Community Center – Youth programs, cultural outreach initiatives and life skills courses 
  • Heart House – Head, Heart and Hands (H3) program
  • Healing Hands Ministries Inc. – Defray cost of healthcare for Burmese refugee women and children
  • IGNITE – Equip Asian American Pacific Islander young women to become lifelong civic and political leaders
  • Literacy Achieves – Family literacy program for immigrant and refugee families
  • Maurice Barnett Geriatric Wellness Center Inc. – Low or no-cost healthcare services for elderly Asian women in their own homes
  • Methodist Richardson Medical Center Foundation’s Asian Breast Health Outreach Project – Breast health outreach and mammograms
  • Mosaic Family Services Inc. – Partial salaries for full time case managers fluent in Laotian, Thai and Hindi
  • Rainbow Days, Inc. – Summer camp program for children experiencing homelessness
  • Richardson Adult Literacy Center – ESL and workforce readiness for low-income
  • Scholar Shot – Academic management, tuition, books and supplies for scholars
  • Texas Muslim Women's Foundation Inc. – Intimate partner violence prevention
  • Trinity Habitat for Humanity – Construction cost of a new home for a low-income Asian family
  • United to Learn – Professional development initiatives
  • Vickery Meadow Youth Development Foundation – College readiness program for students, educational program support for Asian parents

Orchid Giving Circle at TXWF Chair Mylinh Luong said, “These nonprofit organizations are helping Asian and Asian Americans who need the most assistance. We are thankful to our members, donors, corporate sponsors and in-kind supporters for helping us make a significant impact.”

Dena Jackson, interim president and CEO of Texas Women’s Foundation, said, “We salute the amazing work that Orchid Giving Circle at TXWF does to make a difference in the lives of the North Texas Asian community. The collective impact is truly a ripple effect in North Texas.”

About Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation:

As the first giving circle at Texas Women’s Foundation launched in 2015, the Orchid Giving Circle at TXWF is a group of Asian women who collaborate, pool their resources and leverage their networks to generate community grants that support social change and services benefitting the North Texas Asian community. Orchid members represent a wide range of Asian cultures, ages, ethnicities and professions with the goal of increasing awareness of the local Asian population, community needs and knowledge about philanthropy. The group has provided grants in education, housing, healthcare, arts and culture, social services and more to the North Texas Asian community. It is also a member of the Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy.

Orchid’s leadership includes the following: Mylinh Luong (Chair), Kim Cummings (Vice Chair), Monica Chen (Grants), Lillian Jersa (Treasurer), Anna Hung (Secretary), Priya Venkat (Membership) and Cynthia Yung (Advisor). The founders include Arang Cistulli, Kim Cummings, Sejal Desai, Loh-Sze Leung, Caren K. Lock,,  Mylinh Luong, Lynette Payne, Gowri Sharma, Thear Suzuki, Charmaine Tang, Anne Woods, Cynthia Yung, Trea Yip and Radhika Zaveri. For more information about Orchid Giving Circle and grants, visit https://www.txwf.org/orchid-giving-circle/ or email orchidgivingcircle@gmail.com.

About Texas Women’s Foundation: As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its invested assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation 2023 Honorees Froswá Booker-Drew, Ph.D., Aimee Cunningham, Madeline Burillo-Hopkins, Ed.D., Mary Pat Higgins, Bee Nance, Ann Sheu, Jill Louis

Texas Women’s Foundation seeks nominations for its Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards, which recognize leaders who have positively impacted the lives of women and girls. Nominations are due on October 31 via the website: https://txwf.org/events/leadershipawards/

 

The recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration on April 30, 2024, at the Omni Dallas Hotel (555 S. Lamar St, Dallas, TX 75202).

 

Texas Women’s Foundation Maura Award 

For 45 years, the Maura Women Helping Women Award has recognized those who have led the way in improving lives for women and girls in Texas. Nominees must meet the following criteria:

  • Utilizes their role in leadership to advance opportunities to serve the unique needs of women and girls;
  • Has spent an extended period of time in service helping women and girls;
  • Former or current Texas resident; and
  • Must be 40 years of age and older.

 

Texas Women’s Foundation Young Leader Award 

This award recognizes breakthrough leadership exhibited by a Texan. Nominees must meet the following criteria:

  • Achieving success in a field, initiative or sector;
  • Creating a path of opportunity for others to follow;
  • Former or current Texas resident; and
  • Must be between 18-39 years old.

 

According to Dena Jackson, Texas Women’s Foundation interim president and CEO “If you know of the great work of someone who is advancing the lives of women and girls, nominate them for the prestigious Maura Women Helping Women Award or the Young Leader Award. We want to celebrate and elevate them and their successes.”

 

For those interested in sponsorship, contact Joy Busch at maura@txwf.org.   

 

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now.

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TXWF Luncheon 2023 Ashleigh Everett (co-chair), Storm Reid (speaker), Yolanda Garcia (co-chair)

With nearly 1,000 people in attendance, Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) held its 38th annual luncheon on Sept. 26 to celebrate its past and raise funds for the future.

The award-winning Highland Park Lads and Lassies, under direction of actress and director Tiffany Solano, opened the luncheon with a performance of “Brave.”

Co-chairs Ashleigh Everett and Yolanda Garcia shared why they are involved. Everett said, “My personal why is embodied in my mother, who has instilled in me love of community, hard work and importance of creating a legacy. Also my two amazing daughters are growing up in a world where they see women who have accomplished so much, yet still struggle to obtain decent health care, financial security and leadership opportunities.”

Garcia added, “I want to make sure that the opportunities that I was provided in this country, ones not available for my mother and grandmother, are provided for the next generation of leaders. Ashleigh and I had to cross a very tight rope to achieve success, and we want to widen that rope to make the path just a little bit easier for Texas girls and women.”

Cynt Marshall, CEO of the Dallas Mavericks and presenting sponsor, encouraged attendees with the luncheon theme, “Texas Women Now.” She shared this playbook for success: “Choose teammates who are passionate about TXWF. Determine what you’ll do. Get familiar with the playbook. Step on the court and advance the great work of TXWF. Finally, stay alert and ready to make a difference.”

Becky Sykes, one of the 19 founders of the Foundation, first board chair and former TXWF president/CEO, shared about the organization’s legacy and the vision cast 38 years ago to support women. “Helen LaKelly Hunt brought the idea of a women’s foundation to Dallas and rounded up 18 other diverse women. The leadership was intentionally diverse—racially, politically and socio-economically.”

Candice Hill, co-chair of the XIX Society, named for the 19 founders of the Foundation, remarked, “This past year, we have invested $4.9 million in grants to 197 organizations, plus additional support for research and advocacy. Since 1986, we have invested more than $78 million to better the lives of women and families statewide.”

Amanda Kraemer, Target senior vice president, reminded all to invest in this community. She introduced the speaker, Storm Reid, Emmy-nominated actress, producer and USC student, and Deborah Ferguson, NBC 5 anchor, who moderated the conversation.

Ferguson said emphatically to Storm, “You are taking the world by storm!”

Reid told everyone to hold space for diverse women and girls, and to think intentionally about impact.  “When I’m trying to give advice to young women, and I look around at rooms like this—this is proof that people are willing to invest in you, to empower you, to pour into you. You are seen. You are heard. There is a whole foundation that is dedicated to seeing young women be great … I would say the same things my mom said to me:

1. “Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer.”

2. “Stand up for yourself.”

3. “Be a good person.”

4. “Go after what you want.”

Dena L. Jackson, Texas Women’s Foundation interim president and chief executive officer, added, “We experienced meaningful dialogue that inspired us to be part of the change. Together, let's create a more equitable society for us all. With our past in mind and our present at hand, we can create positive economic and social change now, for the future.” 

She added, “We also shared this experience with 200 middle and high school girls from across North Texas. These young women will grow to be future leaders in boardrooms, classrooms and courtrooms. It is up to us to boldly invest in their futures and advocate for them so they have a level playing field.”

Those interested in supporting #TexasWomenNOW with a donation of $238 or more will become a member of the XIX Society. Those who give $500 will receive a branded tote a scarf for donations of $1,000 or more, while supplies last. Donate here.

Special thanks to sponsors:

Presenting sponsor: The Dallas Mavericks

Speaker sponsor: Target, The Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Speaker Endowment Fund at TXWF

Legacy: The Men and Women of Hunt Consolidated, Inc.

Livestream: Toyota

Investor: Aimbridge, Amazon, Frito-Lay, Helen LaKelly Hunt/Safe Conversations, Sidley Austin with Partners Yolanda Garcia and Sara Garcia Duran

Impact: NexBank

For additional sponsors, visit https://www.txwfluncheon.org/sponsors

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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TXWF Impact Charts

Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) continues to advance positive social change, economic security and leadership opportunities for women and families across Texas. During the organization's fiscal year (July 1, 2022-June 30, 2023), the Foundation invested $7.1 million in advancing its mission through research, advocacy, innovative programs and solutions and grantmaking.

Dena L. Jackson, Ph.D., TXWF interim president and CEO, said, “Our research continues to show ongoing impacts of the COVID pandemic and systemic challenges in health care, housing and child care. To address these issues, the Foundation is deploying funds to strategic initiatives, community programs and advocacy efforts that are making change for women statewide.”

Highlights:

  • Texas Women’s Foundation along with its philanthropic partners – Giving Circles, Donor-Advised Fund holders and Young Women’s Initiative – distributed $4.9 million in grants to 197 nonprofit organizations.
  • A grant highlight includes $907,000 distributed from the Health Care Access Fund to help women and girls access health care in rural and medically-underserved Texas communities statewide. (See chart).
  • For a complete list of grantees, visit txwf.org/grants. See additional information below for select grantees’ quotes and how their organization will use these funds.
  • An additional $2.2 million was invested in programs and initiatives that equip girls to become strong women and prepare women to lead in their lives, their workplaces and their communities. Examples include the support of the Foundation’s leadership programs such as the Young Women’s Initiative, advocacy efforts and giving circles.

Carrie Freeman Parsons, Texas Women’s Foundation board chair, added, “Texas Women’s Foundation continues to invest in the lives of women, girls and families statewide thanks to our generous donors and events. Never has our work been more important with the ever-increasing challenges women and girls face, and we stand in the gap ready to help.”

To learn more about the grants, visit txwf.org/grants.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

As Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) nears its 40th year, it is clear that now more than ever is the time to elevate Texas women. By working with women, families and communities, they are building a stronger, more equitable Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, TXWF raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7.1 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through timely research, advocacy, grants and strategic initiatives. Since inception in 1985, TXWF has invested $78.9 million in women and girls. Their statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and leadership initiatives support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now
 

Select Grantees

 

Hope Clinic of McKinney (Collin County)

The grant from Texas Women's Foundation will assist low-income, minority, single mother and immigrant women, who are all more likely to find affordable health care out of reach, especially when it comes to addressing their female-specific health needs. Hope Clinic increases access to preventative cancer screening and prevention services for low-income, uninsured females in Collin County with its well-woman exams, which include PAP smears, STD testing and treatment, HPV vaccines, HIV testing, colposcopies, cervical biopsies, family planning and contraception, breast exams and on-site mobile-unit mammogram clinics or mammogram referrals. This grant funding will be used for its well-woman program, including in-clinic appointments, labs, vaccinations and supplies. 

Vicki Northcutt, Executive Director – Development, Hope Clinic of McKinney

“Having the ability to offer these services in-house, instead of referring to another off-site location or another medical specialist, provides much needed trusted access and consistency for our patients. This ultimately results in fewer no-shows because our patients are typically more comfortable with us as their medical home.”

Agape Resources & Assistance Center, Inc. (Collin County)

Agape Resource & Assistance Center, Inc. (“Agape”) is celebrating 10 years of successfully empowering homeless women led families to move from crisis, poverty and abuse to fulfilling, self-sustaining lives by providing safe, stable transitional housing and critical transformational services including childcare, workforce education, transportation assistance, budgeting, credit repair and counseling. Despite graduating from Agape with higher wages and increased education, Agape women face the near-impossible task of finding safe, economically attainable housing. To provide an innovative solution to truly affordable housing, Agape is expanding its mission and continuum of care by building Jericho Village, an innovative 38-unit urban village of income based rental homes in Wylie, Texas. Jericho Village will provide income-based rental homes not only for women led families who graduate from Agape, but for other households who struggle each month to stay safely housed. About 95% of the units will serve households earning 80% or less of Area Median Income (AMI), with 60% targeting households earning 50% or less of AMI. All Villagers will have on-site access to Agape’s Empowerment Services, the secret sauce to attaining and retaining economic stability. The generous support of Texas Women’s Foundation through an operating grant for Jericho Village will allow Agape to staff and implement customized onsite casework and property management in advance of the grand opening, which they hope to celebrate in 1st quarter of 2024.

Rev. Janet Collinsworth, Founder and CEO of Agape and Jericho Village:

“Texas Women’s Foundation understands that the problem of homelessness and homeless prevention is not solved with roofs, but rather with accessible support services that empower those who struggle to stay safely housed to increase their economic stability and move from fear of homelessness to looking forward with hope. This grant will allow Agape to build on the success of our transitional housing program and expand our Empowerment Support Program to serve all the families in Jericho Village, changing lives today and to the 4th and 5th generation.”

Dallas Leadership Foundation (Dallas County)

The grant from Texas Women’s Foundation provides funding for Dallas Leadership Center's Teen Girls Mentoring Program. This program provides trained female mentors to work with girls ages 14 to 18 to help them navigate school, social situations, dating, after high school careers and education goals, and other support to help the girls graduate high school and make good decisions into their future. 

DLF Board Member, Charlene Powell-Atkins:

“DLF is so honored to receive funding from Texas Women’s Foundation. The funds will allow DLF to expand and improve our mentorship program for high school girls. Young girls of color often reside in areas with limited opportunities for them to find their voice. Programming such as this creates space for girls, provides exposure, improves self-esteem and allows them to grow in confidence.”

The Way Back (Dallas County):

Funds from this grant will provide The Way Back with the opportunity to offer counseling services, hire an additional case manager, expand outreach, and increase advocacy on behalf of the thousands of women in prison or on probation/parole, while answering the growing need to expand services to more women returning to the local communities from incarceration who are often victims of violent crime themselves (sexual assault, sex trafficking, domestic abuse).

A client of The Way Back:

“I am so thankful and grateful for The Way Back and all of the services and support they provide. The Way Back helped me find employment and assisted me with bus passes so that I could get back and forth to work. They also helped me with eyeglasses, hygiene and clothes. The staff spent time education me on how to budget my money, and I have even started saving. I have never had a savings. I felt so comfortable talking with the staff, and it is a good feeling to know that there are people who really care.”


Hearts for Homes (Denton County)

This grant from Texas Women's Foundation is a huge blessing for Hearts for Homes and the senior homeowners that they serve. It will not only go toward making home repairs, but also helping to pay the salary of a part-time project coordinator. Having one full-time and two part-time project coordinators allows them to answer the seniors' repair needs quicker and in a more efficient manner. The nonprofit is constantly dealing with emergency repairs such as plumbing leaks and A/C units going out on these 100+ degree days, but also safety modifications such as replacing rotten subfloors, tub-shower conversions, wheelchair ramp installations, installation of ADA toilets, etc. to make living and navigating in their homes easier and safer for their seniors.

Susan Frank, Founder & Executive Director, Hearts for Homes:

“I cannot express my thanks enough for Texas Women's Foundation blessing Hearts for Homes with a grant this year. We are so thankful that your organization believes in what we are doing to help Denton County low-income seniors homeowners, most of whom are women, have a safe, comfortable, and well-functioning home to live out their years with hope and dignity. This is a huge blessing to Hearts for Homes, our senior homeowners and me personally. Thank you for your faithful support.”

Children’s Advocacy Center for North Texas (Denton County)

Funding will be used towards improving its response to High-Risk Youth and provide preventative care to break the cycle of kids at risk of becoming involved in sex trafficking, drug abuse or other harmful activities. Through this support, the organization will train more mental health providers to work with this group of kids, improve parental response to why their kids are acting out this way, and increase how law enforcement, juvenile system and other first responders support child victims part of its High Risk Youth/Child Sexual Exploitation program caseload.

A quote from a parent of a teen:

“After my daughter has been coming to the Center, I know our relationship is better; she is open and honest with me and talks to me about her feelings and concerns and includes me in her life instead of isolating me.” 

From a teen client to a therapist:

“I never thought I’d stop seeing the images of the abuse in my head, but they are gone now! I know I can accomplish things in my life without stuff from years ago weighing on my shoulders!”

The Ladder Alliance (Tarrant County)

Funding from Texas Women’s Foundation will support career-readiness programs designed to create a pipeline of highly qualified program graduates (women survivors of domestic violence) with the skill set necessary for gainful employment to increase household earnings and directly reduce poverty. The goal is to eradicate the negative effects of domestic violence on women, empowering them with the skills needed to be self-supportive, lead self-reliant lives, and participate as contributing members and leaders in the community. Its programs provide technical skills, build cultural capital, and increase confidence, giving each student the tools and support to realize her true potential, and to pursue individual career goals, leading to a happier, healthier, independent life of self-sufficiency.

Kathryn Thalken, MS, LMFT, The Ladder Alliance Executive Director:

“The support of Texas Women's Foundation comes at a time when it is most needed. For over 20 years, we have supported survivors of domestic violence and low-income women through workforce development. This funding will allow us to not only continue our current programming, but enable us to expand our offerings to even more women who may require our services. We are incredibly grateful.”

Con Mi MADRE (Tarrant County)

Grant funding will support Con Mi MADRE in the continued implementation of programming and support in the Fort Worth area. The 2023-2024 school year will be the 6th year partnering with Fort Worth ISD; a new cohort will be recruited thus serving (6th-11th graders.) 11th graders will enter the Post-Secondary Participation Program, meaning they will initiate the college application process with the guidance of a Con Mi MADRE staff.

Con Mi MADRE Parent:

“El programa es una excelente oportunidad de empoderamiento para nuestras hijas y también a las madres que sin importar de donde venimos, el idioma que hablamos, podemos lograr los sueños.” (“The program is an excellent empowerment opportunity for our daughters and also for mothers that regardless of where we come from [or]
the language we speak, we can achieve dreams.”)