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TXWF Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration

Texas Women’s Foundation seeks nominations for its Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards, which recognize leaders who have positively impacted the lives of women and girls. Nominations are due on November 1 via the website: https://txwfleadership.org/

The recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration, presented by AT&T, on April 26, 2022, at the Omni Dallas Hotel (555 S. Lamar St, Dallas, TX 75202). Co-chairs are Bonnie Clinton, vice president and chief procurement officer, Indirect Procurement, Toyota North America, and Ana Hernandez, senior vice president and senior commercial loan officer, PlainsCapital Bank.

Maura Women Helping Women Award:

For 43 years, the Maura Women Helping Women Award has been presented to more than 200 courageous individuals who have catalyzed change for women and girls.

Young Leader Award:

The Young Leader Award recognizes breakthrough leadership exhibited by a trailblazer who is achieving success in a field, initiative or sector, and creating a path of opportunity for other women to follow.

To learn more about this event and nominate someone, visit https://txwfleadership.org/. For those interested in sponsorship, contact Ashley Lindsay at alindsay@txwf.org or 214.525.5311.  

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now.

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Girls Embracing Mothers
Texas Women’s Foundation continues to lead in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas during a tumultuous year. During the organization's fiscal year (July 1, 2020-June 30, 2021), the Foundation invested $12.9 in advancing its mission through research, advocacy, innovative programs and solutions and grantmaking.
  • Texas Women’s Foundation awarded a total of 416 grants totaling $10.8 million to organizations serving women and girls. (See charts below for distribution of granting by geography, issue area and total granted.)
  • $2.1 million was invested in programs that advance its mission and commitment to building stronger, more equitable communities where women and girls are full participants.

Texas Women’s Foundation also stepped up to the needs of the community in response to COVID-19 and the 2021 winter storm, much of it through the organization’s Resilience Fund, initially established in response to the pandemic. Of the $10.8 million, TXWF granted $3.1 million from April 2020–June 30, 2021 in response to a range of community emergencies, while maintaining a continued focus on the intersection of gender and race and the disproportionate impact on women of color.

According to Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, “We made significant investments through grants that supported the immediate needs of women, girls and their families to address the impact of COVID-19, as well as those that would have a longer-term impact on their lives and the community.”

Resilience Grants Supported Innovation

Access to healthcare is a challenge to women and girls from historically under-resourced communities, and COVID-19 produced additional barriers that TXWF sought to alleviate through the Resilience Fund. One example is a grant supporting an innovative approach for patients of Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic. The clinic’s lead obstetrician, along with UT Southwestern Medical Center and FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics), developed a replicable COVID-safe practice model and template of care that has already gained attention in the industry. The model uses both telehealth and onsite visits with obstetrical staff. The patient response has been positive and no-show rates have decreased.

Resilience Fund: Taking a Mid- to Long-term View

Another Resilience Fund grant increased economic security for women and their families by providing access to a financial institution and access to loans that were not available to them through traditional banking services. A grant to Dallas Area Interfaith Sponsoring Committee supported an alternative banking solution for those without government identification, in partnership with Resource One Credit Union.

COVID-19 increased food insecurity, and a TXWF Resilience Fund grant addressed the immediate need for food for elderly women by expanding a nonprofit’s capacity to reach them when their volunteer force was isolated for their health and safety. The grant supported implementation of a paperless meal delivery system that saved both money and staff time, allowing Meals on Wheels Collin County to serve more clients long-term and even save lives. The system immediately facilitated the day-to-day delivery of meals and decreased the response time for situations identified as safety and/or medical emergencies, especially for homebound and elderly women.

Resilience Grants Supported Nonprofits Working in Historically Marginalized Communities

Texas Women’s Foundation acknowledges the deep commitments that its grantee partners have to the communities they serve. Dawson Thompson added, “We trust that organizations with established community presence and cultural competence are best able to immediately recognize and respond to community needs, especially in times of crisis. Resilience Fund grantees, such as Muslim Community Center for Human Services, Southern Dallas Link and SER Jobs for Progress National, Inc., all share a history of responding to the needs of the unique communities they serve.”

Muslim Community Center for Human Services in Tarrant County teaches employability skills to aid entry of refugee/immigrant/low-income women, primarily survivors of domestic and/or sexual violence, into the workforce. Southern Dallas Link enables single-female headed households of South Dallas to maintain employment and resources by providing safe, dependable transportation. SER Jobs for Progress National, Inc. provided necessities for the Early Head Start families in Grand Prairie and Senior Community Service Employment Program participants in Fort Worth, and supported emergency needs during and after winter storm Uri.

Resilience Grants Supported Organizations Led by Women of Color

A fundamental aspect of TXWF’s work is to support women’s leadership in all sectors. During this past year and a half, organizations led by women of color were at the forefront of addressing the unique needs of their communities, and particularly women of color who were disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.

Among the organizations led by women of color receiving TXWF Resilience Grants are:

  • A TXWF Resilience Grant supported the LiftFund Dallas/Fort Worth Women’s Business Center to serve small businesses owned by women of color and fill the gap for women of color entrepreneurs who have been unable to obtain assistance through mainstream resources. 
  • Girls Embracing Mothers Inc. works with incarcerated women and their daughters. A new grant supported the transition to a mail-based program to maintain the connection between incarcerated mothers and their daughters, as well as pay stipends to the guardians to cover the cost of meals and collect calls to the girls’ mothers. Many guardians were financially stressed due to loss of jobs or reduced availability for work due to their guardianship.
  • At Zan Wesley Holmes Jr. Community Outreach Center, TXWF supported the Financial Wellness Village, which includes the Increments of Success Coaching Program along with case management and therapeutic wellness classes to help women deal with the trauma and loss of income due to COVID-19.

To learn more about the grants, visit txwf.org/grants.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $10 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $67 million in women and girls, including $53 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Hilda Galvan

Texas Women’s Foundation has elected Hilda Galvan as chair, serving a two-year term from July 1, 2021, through June 30, 2023. Galvan, partner-in-charge at Jones Day Dallas, joined the Foundation board in 2016, and has co-chaired both the Economic Leadership Council and the Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration. The Foundation also announced the election of five new board members who will serve three-year terms from 2021-2024.

The Foundation’s new Board of Directors:

  • Veree Hawkins Brown – ISC Group, Inc., Financial Advisor
  • Julie Ramirez – Bank of America Private Bank, Vice President and Client Business Manager
  • Sarah Saldaña – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Director (retired)
  • Shannon Zmud Teicher – Jackson Walker, Partner
  • Shannon Thompson – Texas Instruments Inc., Vice President and Assistant General Counsel

The executive committee includes the following:

  • Hilda Galvan – Chair; Jones Day, Partner-in-Charge
  • Shonn Brown – Immediate Past Chair; Kimberly-Clark, Vice President and Deputy General Counsel
  • Roslyn Dawson Thompson – Texas Women’s Foundation, President & CEO
  • Bonner Allen – Programs Committee Chair; Community Volunteer
  • Effie Dennison – Member at Large; Texas Capital Bank Executive Vice President Director, Community Development & Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Cynt Marshall – Member at Large; The Dallas Mavericks, President and CEO
  • Neena Newberry – Member at Large; Newberry Executive Solutions, President
  • Laura Nieto – Secretary; Southwest Airlines, Director Community Engagement
  • Melissa Orth – Treasurer and Finance Committee Chair; The Legacy Senior Communities, President and CEO
  • Carrie Freeman Parsons – Member at Large; Freeman, Chair
  • Elizabeth Carlock Phillips – Governance Committee Chair; Phillips Foundation, Executive Director
  • Holly Reed – Advocacy Committee Chair; Ryan LLC, Principal & Practice Leader, U.S. Advocacy
  • Rachel Vinson – Investment Advisory Committee Chair; CBRE, Senior Vice President

For a complete board list, visit https://www.txwf.org/about-us/#board-directors.

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, said, “We’re thankful for the leadership of Hilda, our Executive Committee and our Board – an extraordinary group of strong, powerful women who bring so much talent, expertise and passion to advance our mission.” Over the past decade, Dawson Thompson has been credited with increasing the diversity of the board from 22 percent to 52 percent women of color and LGBTQ.

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $10 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $67 million in women and girls, including $53 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

 

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Dominic Benhura, Linda Todd, Mary Brinegar, Dr. Fr Photo credit: Dallas Arboretum/Tim White

On June 23, the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden held a special dinner to honor international acclaimed Zimbabwean stone sculptor, Dominic Benhura. He was in Dallas as part of its Summer of Sculpture exhibit, ZimSculpt.

Known as one of the leading Zimbabwean stone sculptors, Benhura has been sculpting since he was a young boy, learning the skill from his cousin, master sculptor Tapfuman Gutsa. Benhura sold his first piece when he was 12 years old. When he became a father, Benhura began sculpting mothers and children interacting, and these are some of his more popular pieces. He said, “These pieces don’t have faces, so they can be from any culture.”

ZimSculpt features the talent of several contemporary Zimbabwean artists with more than 100 hand-selected, exquisite sculptures artfully displayed throughout the garden. These contemporary pieces, created by the Shona people of Zimbabwe, are carved from various types of serpentine and semi-precious stone, often weighing tons, and can be as large as seven feet tall. ZimSculpt runs through August 8.

ZimSculpt is supported in part by the Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District, The Dallas Mavericks and Texas Telecom Credit Union.

Tickets must be pre-purchased online or by calling 214-515-6615. Wearing a face covering is required for all guests 5 years of age while visiting the Dallas Arboretum, unless medically unable to do so.

About the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden:

The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located on the southeastern shore of White Rock Lake at 8525 Garland Road, Dallas, Texas 75218.  The Dallas Arboretum is also the home of the internationally acclaimed Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. The garden is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. General admission is $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 65 and older, $10 for children 2-12 and free for Arboretum members and children under two. There is an additional cost of $3 per person for entrance into the Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden. On-site parking is $15; pre-purchased online parking is $10. The Dallas Morning News is the principal partner of the Dallas Arboretum.  The Arboretum is supported, in part, by funds from the Dallas Park and Recreation Department.  WFAA is an official media sponsor for the Dallas Arboretum. For more information, call 214.515.6500 or visitwww.dallasarboretum.org.

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GEMS Camp Credit: The GEMS Camp

Thanks to a generous gift from Lyda Hill Philanthropies, Texas Women’s Foundation awarded $638,844 to 29 Dallas/Fort Worth nonprofit organizations* to increase usage of the IF/THEN® Collection. The IF/THEN® Collection is the world’s largest free resource of authentic and relatable photos, videos and biographies celebrating diverse, contemporary women in STEM careers and roles. All nonprofits and schools can use the IF/THEN® Collection for free for non-commercial purposes to highlight and elevate these STEM role models in order to inspire young girls to pursue STEM careers.

 

In November 2020, organizations applied for the grants through the IF/THEN® Fund at Texas Women’s Foundation and received these awards in early 2021. Then, these nonprofits used the grants to creatively use the IF/THEN® Collection assets to increase the visual representation of women in STEM and inspire the next generation of STEM pioneers in North Texas. Examples include printing banners and posters, updating marketing materials, including assets in programming and more.

 

Lyda Hill, founder of Lyda Hill Philanthropies, said, “I’m pleased to partner with Texas Women’s Foundation to reach thousands with positive female STEM role models. The IF/THEN® Fund at the Texas Women’s Foundation establishes a new collaboration between the two organizations that advances gender equity for today’s young girls and builds future equity and leaders across North Texas.”

 

She added, “The goal is for girls everywhere to see STEM as exciting, relevant and cool, and seeding the visual world around us with images of relatable women is key to making this happen… Because IF she can see it, THEN she can be it.”

 

Saki Milton, founder and executive director of the GEMS Camp and a grantee, remarked, “Texas Women's Foundation continues to find innovative ways to support historically marginalized girls with quality programming in all areas. The new IF/THEN® Fund will help the GEMS Camp and other nonprofits provide girls with diverse STEM career role models in a creative, visual way. We are honored to receive this reward.”

 

The GEMS Camp used its grant to support more than 300 high school girls of color through a program called BLING!, a STEM Pathways Institute that teaches      networking skills and STEM related lessons using the IF/THEN® Collection at virtual and in-person gatherings.

 

“The Perot Museum of Nature and Science's Whynauts series represents the future of creative exploration,” said Dr. Linda Silver, the Eugene McDermott Chief Executive Officer of the Perot Museum. “Students engage the inspirational world of science at home or in the classroom, meeting real-life scientist heroes and discovering their possible science futures today. We are deeply grateful for the vision and support of Texas Women's Foundation and Lyda Hill Philanthropies that have helped make The Whynauts possible.”

 

Designed to help build tomorrow’s workforce, the complimentary series – with dialogue in English and Spanish – is expected to reach 250,000 students this year in classrooms, nonprofit organizations and homes across Texas.

 

IF/THEN® seeks to further advance women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) by empowering current innovators and inspiring the next generation of pioneers. Rooted in a firm belief that there is no better time to highlight positive and successful female professional role models, IF/THEN® is designed to activate a culture shift among young girls to open their eyes to STEM careers by:

(1) funding and elevating women in STEM as role models,

(2) convening cross-sector partners in entertainment, fashion, sports, business and academia to illuminate the importance of STEM everywhere, and

(3) inspiring girls with better portrayals of women in STEM through media and learning experiences to pique their interest in STEM careers.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, added, “Whether the outcome is a girl embarking on a STEM career with role models to guide her path, the introduction of STEM in a way that ignites curiosity and ambition among students who haven't previously considered STEM careers, or elevation of the representation of women in STEM, Texas Women’s Foundation is honored to partner with Lyda Hill Philanthropies IF/THEN® Initiative to collaborate in advancing gender equity for today’s girls and tomorrow’s STEM leaders.”

 

IF/THEN® Collection

The Collection is part of the IF/THEN® Initiative, a national effort sponsored by Lyda Hill Philanthropies® to inspire young girls to pursue STEM careers while creating a culture shift in how the world perceives women in STEM. The Collection features 125 female STEM innovators selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Lyda Hill Philanthropies® to be AAAS IF/THEN® Ambassadors, all serving as high-profile role models for girls. More information can be found at https://www.ifthencollection.org/

 

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

 

 # # #

*Grantees:

A Chance to Learn/Motivated Mom         

Beacon Hill Preparatory Institute              

Big Brothers Big Sisters Lone Star              

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas County          

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Tarrant County       

Communities In Schools Dallas Region Inc.            

Dallas Afterschool (DAS)               

Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Society Inc.             

Dallas Zoological Society              

Design Connect Create  

Fort Worth Zoological Association            

Friends of Solar Prep      

Frontiers of Flight Museum         

GEMS Camp       

Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas    

Girls Inc. of Tarrant County          

Jubilee Park & Community Center 

Junior Players Guild         

National Math and Science Initiative        

Perot Museum of Nature and Science  

Readers 2 Leaders           

REAL School Gardens DBA Out Teach        

Shared Housing Center  

TalkSTEM             

TeCo Theatrical Productions Inc. DBA Bishop Arts Theatre Center              

United to Learn 

Uplift Education                

Young Women's Preparatory Network 

Young Women's STEAM Academy at Balch Springs Middle School/Dallas ISD Foundation  

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Event co-chairs Hattie Hill and Jana Etheridge

Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) held its 42nd annual Leadership Forum and Awards Celebration (LFAC), presented by AT&T, on April 29. The Foundation honored five Maura Women Helping Women recipients and two Young Leader Award recipients who have made positive impacts in the lives of women and girls. The keynote conversation featured Adriana Gascoigne, author of Tech Boss Lady and founder and CEO of Girls in Tech, interviewed by AT&T’s Senior Vice President of Engineering and Operations Marachel Knight.

After the compelling talk, the honorees and TXWF leaders and supporters participated in leadership forums with event attendees. LFAC netted $475,000 to further the mission of Texas Women’s Foundation.

Co-chairs Jana Etheridge, senior vice president, chief of staff & customer office, Financial Services, Capital One, and Hattie Hill, president and CEO of T.D. Jakes Foundation, welcomed everyone and discussed how difficult the pandemic has been on women, particularly working moms who have had to balance work, school, child care and family duties – if they had a job where they could work from home.

Brenda Jackson, Leadership Awards Selection Committee co-chair, gave a history of the leadership awards.

A. Shonn Brown, Chair of the Texas Women’s Foundation’s Board, introduced three of the award recipients.

  • Maura Award Recipient Trisha Cunningham is leading in calm and in crisis as the president and CEO of North Texas Food Bank by leading a staff of 180 that helped serve 97 million meals in 2020.
  • Rani Puranik, Maura Award recipient, is an intrapreneur and global change agent as co-owner and Global CFO of Houston-based Worldwide Oilfield Machine and leading supporter of an Indian school.
  • Young Leader Award Recipient Kim Roxie is an entrepreneur and catalyst for women of color as founder and CEO of LAMIK Beauty that caters to multicultural women.

Co-chair Hattie Hill introduced the two award recipients:

  • Maura Award Recipient Judy Treviño is paying it forward as executive director of CCVI Ministries, an international nonprofit organization that is transforming the lives of people and the community.
  • Cheryl Polote Williamson, Maura Award recipient, is helping people find their power through their purpose as founder of Soul Reborn and Cheryl Polote Williamson LLC.

Co-chair Jana Etheridge introduced two award recipients:

  • Young Leader Award Recipient Diana Mao is transforming women from victimized to victorious as the president of Nomi Network whose mission is to eradicate human trafficking.
  • Jin-Ya Huang, Maura Award recipient, invests in women as the founder of Break Bread, Break Borders that empowers refugee women economically through the storytelling of cooking, food and culture.

Jennifer Biry, chief financial officer of AT&T’s Warner Media business and presenting sponsor, introduced the keynote speaker, Adriana Gascoigne and Marachel Knight.

Marachel Knight moderated the discussion with Adriana Gascoigne and asked her questions about her life, career and advice. Gascoigne, who has often been the only female and woman of color at many start-up companies gave the following advice:

  • Leadership starts at the top.
  • Resiliency is an important quality in starting a business.
  • Find your passion and purpose.
  • Find the right partners and the right funding sources.
  • Don’t be afraid to take risks.

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer, thanked Gascoigne and Knight.

Following the event, attendees selected one of the breakout Leadership Forums featuring a moderated discussion with the award recipients about key issues and their own pathways to leadership.

In addition to the video recordings, Texas Women’s Foundation launches Gender Matters™, a podcast series sponsored by Kimberly-Clark Corp. that features in-depth interviews with each award recipient with Kimberly-Clark Corp. executives and TXWF CEO Roslyn Dawson Thompson. More information can be found at txwfleadership.org.

A special thank you to the sponsors:

Presenting Sponsor: AT&T

Speaker Sponsor: Catherine M. Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership at Texas Women’s Foundation

Podcast Sponsor: Kimberly-Clark Corp.

Leadership Forum Sponsors: Capital One, Comerica Bank, EY, Fossil Foundation, Kleinert Foundation, Texas Capital Bank, Thomson Reuters

Impact Sponsor: T.D. Jakes Foundation

Advocate Sponsors: Haynes and Boone, Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt, Mary Kay, Texas Instruments

Media Sponsors: D CEO, Local Profile, MySweetCharity

For additional sponsors and information, visit https://txwfleadership.org/

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Adriana Gascoigne (speaker)

Texas Women’s Foundation has announced the  recipients of its 2021 Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards, which recognize leaders who have positively impacted the lives of women and girls. The seven recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Celebration, presented by AT&T, on April 29th. The virtual event begins at 10:00 a.m., and tickets are $42 in honor of the 42nd anniversary of the Maura Awards. Co-chairs are Jana Etheridge, Managing VP, Chief of Staff & Customer Office Financial Services at Capital One, and Hattie Hill, president and CEO of T.D. Jakes Foundation.

 

The event’s keynote speaker is Adriana Gascoigne, author of Tech Boss Lady and founder and CEO of Girls in Tech, a San Francisco-based nonprofit with 43 chapters in 32 countries, which is devoted to empowering, educating and engaging women in the tech industry. In 2018, she was named one of the 20 most influential Latinos in technology by CNET and also received the Pioneer Leadership Award at the Silicon Valley Latino Leadership Summit. Her keynote is supported in part by the Catherine M. Coughlin Endowment for Women’s Leadership at Texas Women’s Foundation.

At 10:50 a.m., event attendees will select and join one of the breakout Leadership Forums, featuring a moderated discussion with the award recipients about key issues and their own pathways to leadership. There will be opportunities for event attendees to interact and participate. The Forums will be videotaped and available within 24 hours. In addition to the video recordings, Texas Women’s Foundation will also launch Gender Matters™, a podcast series sponsored by Kimberly-Clark that will feature in-depth interviews with each award recipient.

“We are excited to celebrate the remarkable achievements and inspiring stories of our Maura and Young Leader award recipients, who truly are agents of powerful and positive change for women and girls in Texas and beyond,” said Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and chief executive officer. “We are also eager to hear from Adriana Gascoigne, who has made it her mission to create a global network of support for women in technology and who totally lives up to her book’s title, Tech Boss Lady.

Maura Women Helping Women Award:

For 42 years, the Maura Women Helping Women Award has been presented to courageous individuals who have catalyzed change for women and girls. The 2021 Maura recipients join the esteemed company of more than 200 previous honorees. The five 2021 recipients are:

Trisha Cunningham

Servant Leader & Champion of Eliminating Hunger in North Texas

North Texas Food Bank

Trisha Cunningham is president and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB), a $200 million nonprofit leading the fight against hunger in North Texas. She and her team of 200 employees and thousands of volunteers worked with more than 200 partners in their feeding network to provide access to 97 million meals last fiscal year. Prior to NTFB, she served as Chief Citizenship Officer at Texas Instruments to build stronger communities globally. Some of her recent awards include being named as a Dallas Business Journal’s 2020 Women in Business honoree and 2020 Most Inspiring Leader, D CEO’s Dallas 500 Most Influential Business Leaders in 2019 and 2020, Dallas Regional Chamber’s Leadership Dallas 2019 Distinguished Alumni and Junior League of Collin County’s 2019 Nonprofit Executive of the Year. When she is not nourishing her neighbors, she serves on numerous nonprofit boards, engages in civic opportunities and spends time with her family.  

Jin-Ya Huang

Artist & Impact Innovator for Immigrant Women

Break Bread, Break Borders (BBBB)

Jin-Ya Huang is a social impact, community development and creative innovator with a focus on the intersection of equity, design and social justice work. She is the founder of Break Bread, Break Borders, a culinary training social enterprise that economically empowers refugee women from war-torn countries through the storytelling of cooking, food and culture. An acclaimed interdisciplinary artist, she creates work that examines her Asian identity and diasporic immigrant experience. Huang is also an accomplished, published writer and public speaker. With an eye towards new approaches to entrepreneurship, empowering women and improving race relations, she serves on multiple advisory boards and is a member of Texas Women’s Foundation’s Orchid Giving Circle. Huang is highly regarded for her ability to bring communities and people of all backgrounds together and has a reputation as a bridge builder. She is a current fellow of PLS, the Presidential Leadership Scholars Program.

Revati “Rani” Puranik

Intrapreneur & Global Change Agent for Young Women

Worldwide Oilfield Machine (WOM)

Co-Owner and Global CFO of Houston-based Worldwide Oilfield Machine, Rani Puranik thrives at leading innovation, empowering others and inspiring collaboration. A motivational speaker and a certified Master Coach in Leadership Development, she is passionate about mentoring the next generation of leaders. She also serves as the executive director of the Puranik Foundation, the corporate social responsibility arm of WOM, representing three generations of women committed to education, wellness and sustainability. Founded by her mother and now managed by her eldest daughter, the Puranik Foundation operates a residential school in India called Vision International Learning Center. Puranik was named a “Top Leading Women in Energy” by the Houston Business Journal and Business Woman of the Year by the Indo-American Chamber of Commerce of Greater Houston. She is finishing her first book, “7 Letters to My Daughters,” slated for release later this year.

Judy Treviño

Charity Leader & Advocate for Women's Financial Empowerment

CCVI Ministries, Inc.

Judy Treviño serves as the executive director for CCVI Ministries, Inc., an international nonprofit organization sponsored by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word. The San Antonio native is most proud of being a first-generation college graduate with a bachelor’s and master’s degrees and is currently pursuing her doctoral degree. Treviño was appointed by the Governor of Texas to the Prepaid Higher Education Tuition Board, and the San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg appointed her to the City of San Antonio’s Audit Committee. She is active on several boards and was recently elected to the Texas Business and Professional Women’s Foundation board. She graduated from the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Latina Leadership Institute and participated in Leadership San Antonio Class 41. She has presented to the Latina Leadership Institute and the Boardroom Project that educates women in running for public office or serving on a board.

Cheryl Polote Williamson

Filmmaker, Author, Speaker & Entrepreneurial Activator  

Soul Reborn

Nationally acclaimed, multi best-selling author, award-winning filmmaker and executive producer, transformational speaker and success coach, Cheryl Polote Williamson is a global leader who has successfully ushered 438 men and women into thriving entrepreneurships. Williamson, CEO and founder of Williamson Media Group, LLC, and Cheryl Polote Williamson, LLC, where her knowledge, expertise and resources connect others to their purpose, is a highly sought-after influencer and business leader. She is founder and CEO of Soul Reborn, a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization that has supported more than 4,500 disenfranchised, under-served and previously incarcerated women through lectures, classes, summits and conferences on leadership, entrepreneurship, money management, etiquette, storytelling and philanthropy. Williamson spearheaded Soul Reborn serving over 10,000 frontline and essential workers and children and families in need from March through December 2020 during the global pandemic. Williamson tours nationally motivating audiences. She has received multiple national and international media features and mentions and several awards for her leadership capabilities.

Young Leader Award:

The Young Leader Award recognizes breakthrough leadership exhibited by a trailblazer who is achieving success in a field, initiative or sector, and creating a path of opportunity for other women to follow.

Diana Mao

Global Crusader & Protector Against Human Trafficking

Nomi Network

Diana Mao is an abolitionist with a mission to eradicate human trafficking in her lifetime. She actively champions for change, and her visionary skillsets have urged Nomi Network forward into enormous growth and success. Nomi Network combats human trafficking by creating pathways to safe employment, empowering women and girls to break cycles of slavery in their families and communities. She is a 2015 Presidential Leadership Scholar, New York Academy of Medicine Fellow, and co-chaired the Nexus Human Trafficking Modern Day Slavery Work Group from 2013-2019. She served on the Public-Private Partnership Advisory Council to End Human Trafficking to advise Federal agencies and Congress on how to strengthen programs for survivors of trafficking. She received the 2018 Pioneer Award from Asian Americans for Equality and 2018 Recent Alumni Impact Award from New York University. She travels extensively to raise awareness and funds for Nomi Network and to build partnerships to fight human trafficking.

Kim Roxie

Entrepreneur & Catalyst for WOC Founders

LAMIK Beauty

Kim Roxie is the founder and CEO of LAMIK Beauty, a clean beauty brand that caters to multicultural women. After opening her own shop at age 21 with a $500 investment, she ran that store for 14 years and was the youngest African-American woman to have her products carried in a major department store. In 2019, Roxie pivoted her business and launched LAMIK as an e-commerce beauty company. In 2020, she secured a partnership with an augmented reality company to launch a tech-enabled website that allows consumers to digitally try on cosmetics. She has received numerous awards including the Barack Obama Lifetime Achievement Award for Community Service, one of the Houston Business Journal’s “40 under 40,” one of the American Business Journal’s Most Influential Young Executives and “one of the 30 Black Stars” by Face2Face Africa. The City of Houston formally named June 23rd as Kim Roxie day in her honor.

To learn more about this event and purchase tickets, visit https://txwfleadership.org/

For those interested in sponsorship, contact Ashley Lindsay at alindsay@txwf.org or 214.525.5311.  

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

 

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In April 2020, Texas Women’s Foundation established the Resilience Fund to provide immediate, mid- and long-term support to women, girls and families most affected by the COVID-19 economic and community health crisis. With $1.4 million raised and granted, the Resilience Fund is impacting lives of many, especially women of color, who have been the hardest hit this year.

 

During this season of giving, the Foundation is asking the community to donate to the Resilience Fund to assist the many women and families who are struggling: https://www.txwf.org/texas-womens-foundation-establishes-resilience-fund/

 

The Resilience Fund supports the following:

 

Child Care:

The Resilience Fund provides grants to support the child care system and working mothers facing the lack of immediate and long-term child care options. The coronavirus has forced temporary and permanent closure of almost half of Texas' child care providers, impacting low-income working mothers, especially women of color. Child care is an essential support for working families, especially those who do not have the option to work from home.

 

Housing:

The Resilience Fund also provides grants to support housing stability, offering families rental assistance, transitional housing and self-sufficiency programs. With jobs lost overnight for low-wage workers – many of whom are Black and Latina women and families – women are unable to pay rent and face eviction at a staggering rate.

 

Working Mothers at the Margins:

The Resilience Fund provides grants to support working mothers who are at the greatest economic fragility and risk due to the pandemic. In April, women accounted for 55 percent of the 20.5 million jobs lost. This percentage continued to rise with devastating economic consequences. Texas Women's Foundation's research shows that women, especially women of color, are more likely to experience economic insecurity even in normal times. During today’s challenging times, Texas women are the most economically vulnerable.

 

Health Insurance:

Texas has the highest rate of people without insurance in the nation. To help the uninsured, the Resilience Fund improves access to services for women whose only options are free or at a greatly reduced cost through community-based programs. These services help women with chronic conditions, women who need obstetrical and reproductive health services, and those who have suffered trauma and violence and are in need of mental health services. As Texas' uninsured rate continues to climb, an alarming number of women are experiencing increasing challenges to their physical and mental well-being during the pandemic.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president and CEO of Texas Women’s Foundation, said, “Texas Women’s Foundation has long supported women at the margins. They are the reason we are focused on women’s economic security as a critical mandate for Texas’ future. We know low income women and their families have borne the brunt of the pandemic’s impact, and they continue to face relentless and ongoing challenges in the weeks and months ahead. With the help of our community of donors and friends, we provide timely and meaningful responses to the needs of vulnerable women and families through the Resilience Fund. We hope you will join us in support of those who need us now more than ever.”

 

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Linda Valdez-Thompson, H100 Network President; Cris Zertuche-Wong, H100 Giving Circle Co-Chair; Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Giving Circle Co-Chair

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation announced $125,000 in grants for 23 North Texas area nonprofits serving the needs of Hispanic women and girls in low and moderate income communities.

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation was established in 2019 by the Hispanic 100 Network to further engage Latinas in philanthropy, and to expand resources for local organizations whose mission is to empower, educate and support Latinas in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Latina Giving Circle Co-Chair, said, “The needs of Latinas have been heavily impacted by this year’s pandemic. We know that the path out of poverty and despair is through empowerment and education. At the H100 Latina Giving Circle, we are helping to pave the way to a brighter future. We are grateful to our donors who are creating multi-generational hope and helping to fuel the dreams of many Latinas.”

Grants were given to the following:

  • Aberg Center for Literacy (Aspire) – Early childhood classroom addition and salary
  • Bridge Breast Network – Breast health information and patient navigation 
  • Bryan’s House – Mentorship program and financial assistance fund
  • Buckner International – Educational programming costs 
  • Catch Up & Read – Child Literacy Program, tutoring and teacher training 
  • Genesis Women’s Shelter – Therapy, advocacy, education and bilingual counselor salary
  • Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas-Dallas – College preparatory skills 
  • Hope Clinic of McKinney – Medical and behavioral health care services, bilingual staff and transportation services 
  • Human Rights Initiative of North Texas – Access Initiative to help with employment, interpreter and transportation fees
  • Ignite – Program support for increased Hispanic women and girls representation in politics 
  • Jubilee Park Community Center – Empowering Women, Creating Strong Families program 
  • Ladder Alliance – Computer and office skills training
  • Literacy Achieves – Bilingual staff costs for English Literacy and Life Skills program 
  • Metrocrest Services – Emergency rent and utility assistance for Hispanic female-led households 
  • Mosaic Family Services – Bilingual shelter advocate salary  
  • Our Friend’s Place – Program and staff salary costs 
  • POETIC – Program funding for education, therapy and economic empowerment opportunities 
  • Rosa es Rojo – Support for cancer and wellness prevention for Hispanic women 
  • Shared Housing Center – Mentoring for high school/college Latina girls and education for their moms on college and career choices 
  • The Compelling Why – Seminar programming for students on education, personal responsibility and leadership
  • The Family Place – Latina Outreach Program to provide client services in Spanish
  • Women’s Business Council-Southwest – Women of Color Outreach Initiative to identify, certify and support businesses 
  • Young Women’s Preparatory Network (YWPN) – Support of YWPN College Bound Program for Hispanic female students 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and CEO, said, “Brava to H100 Latina Giving Circle for raising and distributing such a significant amount of funds in these difficult times, and enabling these nonprofits to meet the needs of Latinas in North Texas.”

The H100 Latina Giving Circle is open to anyone who has a desire to join a legacy of philanthropy that creates positive change by investing in the lives of Latinas. Donors of the H100 Latina Giving Circle have the opportunity to give, connect and participate in the grant making process with a range of opportunities to review, vet and vote on a selection of grantees. To learn more about joining the H100 Latina Giving Circle, visit https://www.txwf.org/h100latinagivingcircle/ or email H100latinagc@txwf.org.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

About Hispanic 100:

Founded in 1996, the Hispanic 100 network is an organization of trailblazing Latina leaders in the Dallas/Fort Worth area whose contributions have shaped, influenced and transformed how Latinas are viewed in business, education, arts, health, politics and community leadership. The Hispanic 100 is a highly diverse network of Latinas with a 20-year history whose value proposition as a collective group is the strength of their experiences, their reach and their capacity to influence change.

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The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation announced $125,000 in grants for 23 North Texas area nonprofits serving the needs of Hispanic women and girls in low and moderate income communities.

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation was established in 2019 by the Hispanic 100 Network to further engage Latinas in philanthropy, and to expand resources for local organizations whose mission is to empower, educate and support Latinas in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Latina Giving Circle Co-Chair, said, “The needs of Latinas have been heavily impacted by this year’s pandemic. We know that the path out of poverty and despair is through empowerment and education. At the H100 Latina Giving Circle, we are helping to pave the way to a brighter future. We are grateful to our donors who are creating multi-generational hope and helping to fuel the dreams of many Latinas.”

Grants were given to the following:

  • Aberg Center for Literacy (Aspire) – Early childhood classroom addition and salary
  • Bridge Breast Network – Breast health information and patient navigation 
  • Bryan’s House – Mentorship program and financial assistance fund
  • Buckner International – Educational programming costs 
  • Catch Up & Read – Child Literacy Program, tutoring and teacher training 
  • Genesis Women’s Shelter – Therapy, advocacy, education and bilingual counselor salary
  • Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas-Dallas – College preparatory skills 
  • Hope Clinic of McKinney – Medical and behavioral health care services, bilingual staff and transportation services 
  • Human Rights Initiative of North Texas – Access Initiative to help with employment, interpreter and transportation fees
  • Ignite – Program support for increased Hispanic women and girls representation in politics 
  • Jubilee Park Community Center – Empowering Women, Creating Strong Families program 
  • Ladder Alliance – Computer and office skills training
  • Literacy Achieves – Bilingual staff costs for English Literacy and Life Skills program 
  • Metrocrest Services – Emergency rent and utility assistance for Hispanic female-led households 
  • Mosaic Family Services – Bilingual shelter advocate salary  
  • Our Friend’s Place – Program and staff salary costs 
  • POETIC – Program funding for education, therapy and economic empowerment opportunities 
  • Rosa es Rojo – Support for cancer and wellness prevention for Hispanic women 
  • Shared Housing Center – Mentoring for high school/college Latina girls and education for their moms on college and career choices 
  • The Compelling Why – Seminar programming for students on education, personal responsibility and leadership
  • The Family Place – Latina Outreach Program to provide client services in Spanish
  • Women’s Business Council-Southwest – Women of Color Outreach Initiative to identify, certify and support businesses 
  • Young Women’s Preparatory Network (YWPN) – Support of YWPN College Bound Program for Hispanic female students 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and CEO, said, “Brava to H100 Latina Giving Circle for raising and distributing such a significant amount of funds in these difficult times, and enabling these nonprofits to meet the needs of Latinas in North Texas.”

The H100 Latina Giving Circle is open to anyone who has a desire to join a legacy of philanthropy that creates positive change by investing in the lives of Latinas. Donors of the H100 Latina Giving Circle have the opportunity to give, connect and participate in the grant making process with a range of opportunities to review, vet and vote on a selection of grantees. To learn more about joining the H100 Latina Giving Circle, visit https://www.txwf.org/h100latinagivingcircle/ or email H100latinagc@txwf.org.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

About Hispanic 100:

Founded in 1996, the Hispanic 100 network is an organization of trailblazing Latina leaders in the Dallas/Fort Worth area whose contributions have shaped, influenced and transformed how Latinas are viewed in business, education, arts, health, politics and community leadership. The Hispanic 100 is a highly diverse network of Latinas with a 20-year history whose value proposition as a collective group is the strength of their experiences, their reach and their capacity to influence change.

Contact Info

Texas Women's Foundation
32.8616333 -96.7695385
Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $10 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $67 million in women and girls, including $53 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now.
Address
8150 N. Central Expwy., Suite 110
Dallas, TX 75206
Phone
214.965.9977
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