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Linda Valdez-Thompson, H100 Network President; Cris Zertuche-Wong, H100 Giving Circle Co-Chair; Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Giving Circle Co-Chair

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation announced $125,000 in grants for 23 North Texas area nonprofits serving the needs of Hispanic women and girls in low and moderate income communities.

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation was established in 2019 by the Hispanic 100 Network to further engage Latinas in philanthropy, and to expand resources for local organizations whose mission is to empower, educate and support Latinas in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Latina Giving Circle Co-Chair, said, “The needs of Latinas have been heavily impacted by this year’s pandemic. We know that the path out of poverty and despair is through empowerment and education. At the H100 Latina Giving Circle, we are helping to pave the way to a brighter future. We are grateful to our donors who are creating multi-generational hope and helping to fuel the dreams of many Latinas.”

Grants were given to the following:

  • Aberg Center for Literacy (Aspire) – Early childhood classroom addition and salary
  • Bridge Breast Network – Breast health information and patient navigation 
  • Bryan’s House – Mentorship program and financial assistance fund
  • Buckner International – Educational programming costs 
  • Catch Up & Read – Child Literacy Program, tutoring and teacher training 
  • Genesis Women’s Shelter – Therapy, advocacy, education and bilingual counselor salary
  • Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas-Dallas – College preparatory skills 
  • Hope Clinic of McKinney – Medical and behavioral health care services, bilingual staff and transportation services 
  • Human Rights Initiative of North Texas – Access Initiative to help with employment, interpreter and transportation fees
  • Ignite – Program support for increased Hispanic women and girls representation in politics 
  • Jubilee Park Community Center – Empowering Women, Creating Strong Families program 
  • Ladder Alliance – Computer and office skills training
  • Literacy Achieves – Bilingual staff costs for English Literacy and Life Skills program 
  • Metrocrest Services – Emergency rent and utility assistance for Hispanic female-led households 
  • Mosaic Family Services – Bilingual shelter advocate salary  
  • Our Friend’s Place – Program and staff salary costs 
  • POETIC – Program funding for education, therapy and economic empowerment opportunities 
  • Rosa es Rojo – Support for cancer and wellness prevention for Hispanic women 
  • Shared Housing Center – Mentoring for high school/college Latina girls and education for their moms on college and career choices 
  • The Compelling Why – Seminar programming for students on education, personal responsibility and leadership
  • The Family Place – Latina Outreach Program to provide client services in Spanish
  • Women’s Business Council-Southwest – Women of Color Outreach Initiative to identify, certify and support businesses 
  • Young Women’s Preparatory Network (YWPN) – Support of YWPN College Bound Program for Hispanic female students 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and CEO, said, “Brava to H100 Latina Giving Circle for raising and distributing such a significant amount of funds in these difficult times, and enabling these nonprofits to meet the needs of Latinas in North Texas.”

The H100 Latina Giving Circle is open to anyone who has a desire to join a legacy of philanthropy that creates positive change by investing in the lives of Latinas. Donors of the H100 Latina Giving Circle have the opportunity to give, connect and participate in the grant making process with a range of opportunities to review, vet and vote on a selection of grantees. To learn more about joining the H100 Latina Giving Circle, visit https://www.txwf.org/h100latinagivingcircle/ or email H100latinagc@txwf.org.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

About Hispanic 100:

Founded in 1996, the Hispanic 100 network is an organization of trailblazing Latina leaders in the Dallas/Fort Worth area whose contributions have shaped, influenced and transformed how Latinas are viewed in business, education, arts, health, politics and community leadership. The Hispanic 100 is a highly diverse network of Latinas with a 20-year history whose value proposition as a collective group is the strength of their experiences, their reach and their capacity to influence change.

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The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation announced $125,000 in grants for 23 North Texas area nonprofits serving the needs of Hispanic women and girls in low and moderate income communities.

The H100 Latina Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation was established in 2019 by the Hispanic 100 Network to further engage Latinas in philanthropy, and to expand resources for local organizations whose mission is to empower, educate and support Latinas in the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Patricia Rodriguez Christian, H100 Latina Giving Circle Co-Chair, said, “The needs of Latinas have been heavily impacted by this year’s pandemic. We know that the path out of poverty and despair is through empowerment and education. At the H100 Latina Giving Circle, we are helping to pave the way to a brighter future. We are grateful to our donors who are creating multi-generational hope and helping to fuel the dreams of many Latinas.”

Grants were given to the following:

  • Aberg Center for Literacy (Aspire) – Early childhood classroom addition and salary
  • Bridge Breast Network – Breast health information and patient navigation 
  • Bryan’s House – Mentorship program and financial assistance fund
  • Buckner International – Educational programming costs 
  • Catch Up & Read – Child Literacy Program, tutoring and teacher training 
  • Genesis Women’s Shelter – Therapy, advocacy, education and bilingual counselor salary
  • Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas-Dallas – College preparatory skills 
  • Hope Clinic of McKinney – Medical and behavioral health care services, bilingual staff and transportation services 
  • Human Rights Initiative of North Texas – Access Initiative to help with employment, interpreter and transportation fees
  • Ignite – Program support for increased Hispanic women and girls representation in politics 
  • Jubilee Park Community Center – Empowering Women, Creating Strong Families program 
  • Ladder Alliance – Computer and office skills training
  • Literacy Achieves – Bilingual staff costs for English Literacy and Life Skills program 
  • Metrocrest Services – Emergency rent and utility assistance for Hispanic female-led households 
  • Mosaic Family Services – Bilingual shelter advocate salary  
  • Our Friend’s Place – Program and staff salary costs 
  • POETIC – Program funding for education, therapy and economic empowerment opportunities 
  • Rosa es Rojo – Support for cancer and wellness prevention for Hispanic women 
  • Shared Housing Center – Mentoring for high school/college Latina girls and education for their moms on college and career choices 
  • The Compelling Why – Seminar programming for students on education, personal responsibility and leadership
  • The Family Place – Latina Outreach Program to provide client services in Spanish
  • Women’s Business Council-Southwest – Women of Color Outreach Initiative to identify, certify and support businesses 
  • Young Women’s Preparatory Network (YWPN) – Support of YWPN College Bound Program for Hispanic female students 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Texas Women’s Foundation president and CEO, said, “Brava to H100 Latina Giving Circle for raising and distributing such a significant amount of funds in these difficult times, and enabling these nonprofits to meet the needs of Latinas in North Texas.”

The H100 Latina Giving Circle is open to anyone who has a desire to join a legacy of philanthropy that creates positive change by investing in the lives of Latinas. Donors of the H100 Latina Giving Circle have the opportunity to give, connect and participate in the grant making process with a range of opportunities to review, vet and vote on a selection of grantees. To learn more about joining the H100 Latina Giving Circle, visit https://www.txwf.org/h100latinagivingcircle/ or email H100latinagc@txwf.org.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.orgFacebookTwitterLinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

About Hispanic 100:

Founded in 1996, the Hispanic 100 network is an organization of trailblazing Latina leaders in the Dallas/Fort Worth area whose contributions have shaped, influenced and transformed how Latinas are viewed in business, education, arts, health, politics and community leadership. The Hispanic 100 is a highly diverse network of Latinas with a 20-year history whose value proposition as a collective group is the strength of their experiences, their reach and their capacity to influence change.

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Texas Women's Foundation Leadership Forum & Awards photo credit: Kristina Bowman

Texas Women’s Foundation is seeking nominations for the 2021 Maura Award and Young Leader Award, which recognize those who have positively impacted the lives of women and girls. Nominations are open online at https://www.txwf.org/events/leadershipawards/. The deadline for submissions is November 13, 2020.

Award recipients will be honored at the Leadership Forum & Awards Event, sponsored by AT&T, in the spring 2021.

Texas Women’s Foundation Maura Award 

For 42 years, the Maura “Women Helping Women” Award has recognized those who have led the way in improving lives for women and girls in Texas. Nominees must meet the following criteria:

  • Utilizes their role in leadership to advance opportunities to serve the unique needs of women and girls;
  • Has spent an extended period of time in service helping women and girls;
  • Former or current Texas resident; and 
  • Must be 40 years of age and older. 

Texas Women’s Foundation Young Leader Award

Texas Women’s Foundation’s Young Leader Award recognizes breakthrough leadership exhibited by a Texan. Nominees must meet the following criteria: 

  • Achieving success in a field, initiative or sector; 
  • Creating a path of opportunity for others to follow; 
  • Former or current Texas resident; and 
  • Must be between 18 – 39 years of age. 

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception, the Foundation has invested more than $56.5 million in women and girls, and of this $42.6 million has been given since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now



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Caren Lock, Sejal Desai, Cynthia Yung

Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation held a virtual Grantee Celebration on October 16 featuring its members, its grantees and a special dance performance. The Giving Circle celebrated its sixth year by distributing $202,000 in grants to 13 nonprofit organizations that serve the North Texas Asian community.

Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation is a group of Asian women who collaborate, pool their resources and leverage their networks to generate community grants that support social change and services benefitting the North Texas Asian community. Orchid members, representing a wide range of Asian cultures, ages, ethnicities and professions, have as their goal to increase awareness of the local Asian population, their community needs and philanthropic opportunities.

This year’s leadership, who served for the past six years, includes Cynthia Yung, Chair; Caren Lock, Secretary; and Sejal Desai, Grants Committee Chair. Incoming leadership starting in 2020 includes Mylinh Luong, Chair Elect; Radhika Zaveri, Secretary; Gowri Sharma, Grants Committee Chair; Jean Chao, Treasurer; and Arang Cistulli, Membership Chair.

Orchid Giving Circle Chair Cynthia Yung said, “We are honored to serve the North Texas Asian community alongside other women's giving circles who focus on communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. Now more than ever, our collective efforts to provide grants that directly support our most vulnerable communities is crucial.” 

The program included grant distributions to 13 deserving nonprofit organizations:

  • Asian and Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund (APIA): Scholarships
  • Chetna: Culturally specific services to South Asian victims of domestic violence including legal services, develop skills in the workforce, and remove transportation barriers they face
  • Communities in Schools of North Texas: Chin Family Empowerment Program to support Chin students in Lewisville ISD schools
  • Dallas Chinese Community Center: Life skills, workplace equality and youth leadership development 
  • Heart House: Holistic after school program utilizing trauma-informed care to help refugee children thrive in their new community
  • IGNITE: Building Political Power in Asian American Young Women
  • It’s a Sensory World! Inc.: Staff training for a program that serves children with special needs
  • Literacy Achieves: Family Literacy Program for immigrant and refugee families, and All Have Value: Campaign addressing anti-Asian discrimination
  • Methodist Richardson Medical Center Foundation: Breast health outreach, education and mammogram access for Asian American women in need
  • Mosaic Family Services Inc.: Mosaic House, a multicultural house for women and children who are domestic violence survivors, and hotline interpretation costs
  • The Senior Source: Foster Grandparent Program
  • Texas Muslim Women's Foundation Inc.: Peace in the Home – Culturally Specialized Family Violence Program (PIH-DV)
  • Vickery Meadow Youth Development Foundation: Mental health support for Asian immigrant middle school through college students.

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president of Texas Women’s Foundation, remarked, “Texas Women’s Foundation congratulates the Orchid Giving Circle on raising these funds during such a challenging year and for thoughtfully selecting so many amazing organizations to support. Orchid was our first Giving Circle, and they play such an important role serving the ever growing Asian community in North Texas. I also want to personally thank Cynthia, Caren and Sejal for their extraordinary leadership these past six years!”

Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation was launched in 2015. The group has provided grants in education, housing, healthcare, arts and culture, social services and more to the North Texas Asian community. In addition, Orchid Giving Circle has an interest in organizations and programs that are led by Asian women. Orchid Giving Circle at Texas Women’s Foundation is a member of the Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy (AAPIP), a national, member-supported philanthropic advocacy organization dedicated to advancing philanthropy in Asian American/Pacific Islander communities. Orchid Giving Circle founders include Arang Cistulli, Kim Cummings, Sejal Desai, Loh-Sze Leung, Caren K. Lock, Mylinh Luong, Lynette Payne, Gowri Sharma, Thear Suzuki, Charmaine Tang, Anne Woods, Cynthia Yung, Trea Yip and Radhika Zaveri.

For more information about Orchid Giving Circle and grants, visit https://www.txwf.org/orchid-giving-circle/ or email orchidgivingcircle@gmail.com.

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation Bonnie Clinton, A. Shonn Brown, DJ Poizon Ivy, Cynt Marshall, Roslyn Dawson Thompson

Texas Women’s Foundation held its 35th Annual Luncheon, presented by Toyota and powered by The Dallas Mavericks, on September 29, featuring a conversation with America Ferrera, award-winning actress, director, producer, The New York Times best-selling author and activist. The conversation was moderated by Laysha Ward, Executive Vice President and Chief External Engagement Officer for Target. As the principal fundraiser for the Foundation, the luncheon raised more than $926,000.

Themed “Texas for All,” the 35th Annual Luncheon, co-chaired by business and community leaders Bonnie Clinton, Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer of Toyota, and Cynt Marshall, President & CEO of The Dallas Mavericks, brought together virtually 2,000+ influential business and philanthropic leaders at the appointed time of the Luncheon, who gathered to support Texas Women’s Foundation’s mission to advance the lives of women, girls and their families in Texas. An additional 11,000 people followed the link to view the Luncheon within 24 hours of the event.

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president & CEO of Texas Women’s Foundation, said, “The Foundation chose the theme ‘Texas For All’ to reinforce the need to build more inclusive and equitable communities. This was beautifully stated in the conversation with America Ferrera and Laysha Ward, as well as in the statements given by our Luncheon co-chairs who spoke to the power of equity and diversity, and how important they are to creating a Texas for All.”

Ferrera’s comments focused on these themes:

  1. The need within all people, of all races and backgrounds, to be seen.
  2. Each person’s unique identity is their superpower, not an obstacle.
  3. In order to reach understanding, we need to get comfortable with uncomfortable situations.
  4. Sisterhood and community give us both strength and support.  
  5. Talent is universal, but opportunity is not.

Dawson Thompson and A. Shonn Brown, TXWF board chairwoman, along with Clinton and Marshall, challenged guests to:

  • educate themselves about the issues,
  • activate networks and influence,
  • advocate for change, and
  • donate to TXWF to continue supporting the transformative work.

A special thank you to the following sponsors:

Presenting Sponsor: Toyota
Powered by: The Dallas Mavericks

Speaker Sponsor: Target, with ongoing support from The Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Fund at Texas Women’s Foundation

Resilience Sponsors: Nancy Ann and Ray L. Hunt, Kimberly-Clark

Leader Sponsor: McKesson

Advocate Sponsors: AT&T, EY, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, LLP, Bev Goulet, Jones Day, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Paula and Ron Parker, Texas Capital Bank, Texas Instruments

Media Sponsors: Dallas Business Journal; D CEO; Fort Worth Business Press, Local Profile, My Sweet Charity.

Additional sponsors are listed here: https://www.txwfluncheon.org/sponsors

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls through groundbreaking research, advocacy, grants and programs. Since inception in 1985, the Foundation has invested $57 million in women and girls, including $43 million since 2011. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Hilda Galvan TXWF Board Chair Elect

Texas Women’s Foundation (TXWF) has announced eight new board members, who will serve three-year terms from 2020-2023, and has also named Hilda Galvan as chair elect. Galvan, partner-in-charge at Jones Day, has served on the Foundation board since 2016, and co-chaired both the Economic Leadership Council and the Leadership Forum & Awards Dinner.  

The new Texas Women’s Foundation directors are:

  • Avery Belyeu, Regional Director, South Central Region Lambda Legal
  • Darcy Cowell, Principal, EY
  • Sakina Foster, Partner, Haynes and Boone, LLP
  • Melissa Orth, President and CEO, The Legacy Senior Communities
  • Gwen Parker, Community Leader and Volunteer
  • Holly Reed, Principal and Practice Leader, U.S. Advocacy Services Practice, Ryan
  • Gowri Sharma, Co-Owner, Top Pot Donuts
  • Julia Simon, Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary, Mary Kay

The executive committee members are:

  • A. Shonn Brown, Chair (Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, Kimberly-Clark)
  • Hilda Galvan, Chair Elect (Partner-in-Charge, Jones Day)
  • Roslyn Dawson Thompson, President & CEO, Texas Women’s Foundation
  • Bonner Allen, Programs Committee Chair (Community Volunteer)
  • Cheryl Alston, Secretary (Executive Director and CIO, Employees’ Retirement Fund of the City of Dallas)
  • Stacey Doré, Member-At-Large (CEO, Sharyland Utilities, L.L.C.)
  • Bev Goulet, Investment Advisory Chair (Retired, American Airlines)
  • Betsy Healy, Advocacy Chair (Associate Director, Harold Simmons Foundation)
  • Michelle Hudson, Treasurer/Finance Chair (Principal, Hudson Peters Commercial)
  • Debra Hunter Johnson, Member-At-Large, (President/Owner, Reciprocity Consulting)
  • Lisa Montgomery, Governance Committee Chair, (Owner and Creative Director, Luxe Events)
  • Laura Nieto, Member-At-Large, (Director, Community Outreach, Southwest Airlines)
  • Charmaine Tang, Member-At-Large, (Executive Director, J.P. Morgan) 

For a complete board list, visit https://www.txwf.org/about-us/#board-directors.

A. Shonn Brown, Texas Women’s Foundation board chair, said, “Our legacy of inclusion is unique in many ways. Texas Women’s Foundation was built on dedication to equity and deep commitment to ending injustice. Our history speaks volumes – from the racial, cultural, ethnic and social diversity of our founders, to the fact that today our board is 49 percent and our staff 53 percent women of color and LGBTQ. As chair, I am proud of what we have achieved, yet I know we have so much more to do as advocates for gender and racial equity. Happily, we are welcoming Hilda as chair elect and eight outstanding new board members. Together, our 47 board members make up one of the most diverse and powerful boards in this region. We’re here to support the magnificent work of TXWF on behalf of women and girls, and to use our power, influence, voice and resolve to advance equity for all.”

About Texas Women’s Foundation: Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $7 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100% of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Hattie Hill

Texas Women's Foundation invites the community to its Virtual Viewpoints: Celebrating Black Philanthropy program on Thursday, August 20, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. This informative program is free, but registration is required.

The event features a discussion about the existing impact and potential of Black philanthropy, particularly with respect to Black philanthropy’s role in advancing economic and racial justice, with a focus on current trends (such as giving societies/circles) and opportunities to get involved.

Panelists include:

Christa Brown-Sanford and Lisa Montgomery, members of The Village Giving Circle, LLC at Texas Women’s Foundation; and

Halima Leak Francis, Ph.D. and Cathryn McClellan Kelly, members of HERitage Giving Fund at Texas Women’s Foundation.

The moderator is Hattie Hill of the T.D. Jakes Foundation.  

Texas Women’s Foundation supports and hosts four circles, including these two African-American giving circles. Since 2016, the four giving circles hosted by Texas Women’s Foundation have awarded more than $500,000 to North Texas nonprofits.

For more information or to register for the webinar, visit https://www.txwf.org/events/viewpoints/

Here is the direct link to register for the webinar:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qHsaelkSSRCygIcjxc7FIw

To learn more about giving circles at Texas Women’s Foundation: https://www.txwf.org/ways-to-give/#giving-circles

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas. One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $6.3 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100% of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation Two findings of Texas Women's Foundation's study is that Texas women are diverse, and women of color (Hispanics, Blacks, African-Americans and Asians) are the majority.

Women are half the population in Texas and hold a significant stake in the Texas workforce, including 63 percent of mothers working. Yet Texas women continue to lag face challenges when it comes to key indicators of economic security, including income, health insurance, college loan debt and housing stability.

These are the findings of Texas Women’s Foundation’s Economic Issues for Women in Texas 2020 report, which highlights the four critical building blocks for a woman and her family to achieve economic security: education, child care, health insurance and housing. The report examines the economic status of Texas women through a lens of gender, race and ethnicity, and identifies opportunities for change and policy recommendations. To access the full report, visit www.txwfecoissues.org.

The study, which was first released in 2014 and is updated every three years, is produced by Texas Women’s Foundation based on research conducted by  Every Texan (formerly Center for Public Policy Priorities). Sources include U.S. Census Bureau data, federal and state agency data, studies by policy organizations and academic research.

Economic Issues for Women in Texas examines both policies and practices at the state level, while identifying areas where innovation and investment can help strengthen women and their families,” explained Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president and CEO of Texas Women’s Foundation. “We encourage our Army of Advocates across Texas to use the study – and its platform of specific recommendations and potential actions – with lawmakers, as well as business and community leaders – to help shape policies and practices that impact women and girls. We hope the research creates a shared understanding and motivates a shared commitment to drive solutions that support women and their families, and a build a stronger Texas for us all.”   

Dena L. Jackson, COO of Texas Women’s Foundation added, “While this data is from before COVID-19 changed all of our lives in so many ways, the building blocks are in the headlines every day as stumbling blocks for women, families and our economy seeking to recover.”

TEXAS WOMEN

The population of Texas, which includes 14 million women and girls, has grown 19 percent in the last decade. Women of color are the majority of Texas women.

A typical Texas woman is:

  • a Millennial (age 36)
  • a woman of color
  • living in a city
  • earning $35,000/year or less
  • working to support her family

Other findings:

  • From 2008 to 2018, the largest population increase was Hispanic women and girls, up 1.3 million, or 31 percent.  
  • The largest percentage increase was Asian women, at 75 percent.
  • For Blacks and African-Americans, the growth was 27 percent.

Women are the face of poverty in Texas:

That means nearly one in six Texas women and girls lack sufficient financial resources to care for themselves and their families, resulting in over 2.3 million women in Texas earning less than the poverty threshold.

The majority of the state’s most vulnerable are Hispanic and Black women: 

While Texas women experience poverty at higher rates than men, two in 10 Hispanic or Black women experience poverty, a rate twice that of White women. Single-mother-led households are almost two times more likely to experience poverty than single-father-led households.

The impact of the gender wage gap is significant:

Almost 60 percent of Texas women are breadwinners or co-breadwinners for their households—but in Texas, the gender wage gap has not budged over the past decade. For every hour that Texas women work, they earn $2.83 less than their male counterpart, based on median hourly wages—with even larger gaps for Black and Hispanic women. Among full-time workers in Texas, women earn $10,136 less per year than men on average.

EDUCATION: A PATHWAY TO ECONOMIC SECURITY

Texas women are highly educated, but underpaid:

Overall, Texas women are well-educated, with 1.4 times as many women as men completing public college in 2018. Yet Texas women still earn less than men in every single occupation. 

Women are at the center of the student debt crisis:

Women hold nearly two-thirds of the outstanding student debt in the United States—about $929 billion. The state has been slowly reducing public investment in Texas colleges and universities since 2000, prioritizing awarding aid to full-time students attending four year universities and leaving little left for part-time students and those attending two-year programs.

Educational achievement is increasing most among Hispanic women:

Although historically facing many obstacles resulting in lower college enrollment and completion, Hispanic women are closing the gap and are now the fastest growing group among women enrolling in and completing Texas public college educations.

CHILD CARE: A CRITICAL WORK SUPPORT FOR WOMEN

About 2.5 million working women in Texas have children, and access to child care is a critical work support Texas women need. 

Child care is as expensive as college:

Full-time infant care in Texas is almost as expensive as college—more than $8,000 per year in 2019. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, child care is affordable if it costs no more than 7 percent of a family’s income. By this standard, only 16 percent of Texas families can afford year-round infant care.

After-school programs are scarce and costly:

When after-school programs are not available, working parents must make difficult choices. Only 15 percent of school age kids participate in after-school programs, due to lack of availability and cost. Nearly half of working women across Texas lack access to appropriate child care in the community where they live or work.

Subsidies and child care deserts are realities:

Over a million Texas children could qualify for subsidized child care through the Texas Workforce Commission, but fewer than 10 percent of eligible children receive it due to lack of funds and lack of child care providers who accept subsidies. Lastly, 48 percent of Texans live in a child care “desert” including 55 percent of Hispanic families and 63 percent of rural families.

HEALTH INSURANCE: A FINANCIAL SHIELD FOR WOMEN

Texas women are uninsured:

Texas women are twice as likely to be uninsured compared with other women across the country. That means over 1.9 million adult Texas women live without the financial shield of health insurance coverage.

Women of color have the least coverage:

Women of color are the least likely to have health insurance, with over 1 in 4 Hispanic women uninsured, as compared to 1 in 10 White women.

Texas women are negatively impacted by health policy:

Today, Texas is one of 14 states that has chosen not to expand Medicaid coverage. As a result, 200,000 more Texas women became uninsured (a one percent increase in the uninsured rate) in the two years following 2016 challenges to Affordable Care Act funding. 

Too many Texas women fall into the “coverage gap:”

One of every five uninsured Texas women making less than the Federal Poverty Level falls in the Medicaid coverage gap—more than 400,000 women—a direct result of Texas choosing not to expand Medicaid.

HOUSING: THE ANCHOR FOR ECONOMIC SECURITY:

Texas women carry a heavy housing burden:

More than 30 percent of families led by women are burdened by the cost of housing in Texas, meaning they spend 30 percent or more of their income on housing. In Texas, almost one in five single women and single mothers experience severe housing burden—spending more than 50 percent of income on housing.

Black women face the highest housing burden:

Over 40 percent of families led by Black women spend more than a third of their income on housing. 

Housing challenges are acute for survivors of domestic violence:

About 90 percent of survivors who seek family violence services will experience homelessness as a result of fleeing an abusive relationship at least once. Almost half will be homeless two or more times.

Women are disproportionately affected by eviction and homelessness:

In Texas, the eviction rate is 2.17 percent, which means there are 206 evictions every day. Fort Worth and Corpus Christi have eviction rates that are double the state average.

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS  

There are a number of policy recommendations spelled out in the study for each of the four building blocks. The study also recommends broader policy changes and adoption of business practices to benefit Texas women that include:

Equal Pay: Working women deserve equal pay.

Education: Expand TEXAS (Toward EXcellence, Access and Success) grant and Promise programs to make college more affordable.  

Child Care: Fund full-day pre-K with community partners; expand or create family-friendly leave and work policies.

Health Insurance: Expand Medicaid, especially for new mothers; include earned paid sick time as part of job; support family leave policies.

Housing: Prioritize transitional housing for domestic violence survivors; improve tenant protections and provide legal aid funding.

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas.  One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $6.3 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100 percent of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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HERitage Giving Fund at Texas Women's Foundation

HERitage Giving Fund at Texas Women's Foundation awarded more than $23,000 in grants to six nonprofit organizations that are led by black women serving black women and girls. During this season of uncertainty, each organization received fully unrestricted grants to immediately support operations and programming in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, HERitage is creating resources for grant recipients to gain access to leadership development with the hope its partnership will help leverage additional funding from other resources. 

The nonprofits:

Carter's House provides quality clothing to children in underserved communities in the North Texas area at no cost.

Heart of Courage provides support and advocacy for women who have their children placed in Texas foster care system and mothers who have aged out of the foster care system.

Hopeful Solutions empowers single mothers by providing the holistic support needed to sustain sobriety and self-sufficient living with their children.

ilooklikeLOVE’s mission is to empower families with resources for

thriving babies, mentor for personal growth, and provide tools for financial freedom.

Inspiring Tomorrow's Leaders’ mission is to create generational legacies of education, job security and retention, and financial stability in communities.  

Texas Tenants' Union empowers tenants through education and organizing to protect their rights, preserve their homes, improve their living conditions and enhance the quality of life in their communities.

Akilah S. Wallace, HERitage chair, said, “We thank our members for donating funds to help these wonderful nonprofit organizations during such a difficult time. We also invite other nonprofits to follow us on social media for information about upcoming funding opportunities, leadership development and resources.”

To learn more, donate or become a member of HERitage Giving Fund at Texas Women's Foundation, visit www.TxWF.org/Heritage-Giving-Fund or email HeritageGivingFund@gmail.com.

HERitage Giving Fund at Texas Women’s Foundation was founded August 2017 during Black Philanthropy Month. The mission of HERitage is to encourage philanthropy in the African-American/Black community, to contribute in a strategic and meaningful way, and to bring a new source of funding to nonprofit organizations serving African-American women and girls throughout the North Texas area. The circle provides an opportunity to learn about issues and organizations that affect and impact the African-American/Black community.

About Texas Women’s Foundation:

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas.  One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $6.3 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100% of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now

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Texas Women's Foundation Resilience Fund

In response to growing needs during this time, Texas Women’s Foundation launched the Resilience Fund to help low income and marginalized women, girls and families who have been hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. In April, the Foundation raised and distributed $320,768 in grants aimed at relief for this group. Of the funds distributed:

  • 86% of the beneficiaries of April Resilience Fund grants are women and girls of color
  • 57% of April Resilience Fund grantee organizations are led by people of color

Lisa de la Garza, Texas Women’s Foundation’s vice president of programs, said, “We see so many who were hit hard by this crisis and face a long and difficult road ahead. We thank those who have contributed to the Resilience Fund, and we ask for others to support us. Join us so that our community's most vulnerable women, girls and families may be resilient, and ultimately, move from surviving to thriving.” 

The organizations that received grants in April included:

  • Carter’s House*
  • Educational First Steps
  • The Family Place
  • Girls Embracing Mothers
  • Heart of Courage*
  • Hopeful Solutions**
  • ilooklikeLOVE, Inc.*
  • Inspiring Tomorrow’s Leaders*
  • Mosaic Family Services Inc.
  • Nexus Recovery Center, Inc.
  • North Dallas Shared Ministries
  • Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas
  • St. Philip’s School and Community Center
  • Texas Tenants’ Union*
  • The Magdalen House, Inc.
  • University of North Texas Foundation
  • Wesley-Rankin Community Center
  • YMCA Metropolitan Dallas

*HERitage Giving Fund Grantees
**Multiple Grants (including HERitage Giving Fund)

TXWF will continue to raise funds and distribute them in the upcoming months.

To contribute to the Resilience Fund, visit https://bit.ly/2WOKV7U

For a complete list of donors, visit https://bit.ly/2xZCDBP

To read the Resilience Report online, visit https://bit.ly/2yW83cB

Texas Women’s Foundation is Transforming Texas for Women and Girls, empowering them to build stronger, more equitable communities. Since 1985, the Foundation has been a trusted leader in advancing social and economic change for women and girls in Texas.  One of the world’s largest women’s foundations, the Foundation raises funding from a broad base of donors, including individuals, foundations and corporations. These resources support more than $6.3 million in annual investments that advance economic security and leadership for Texas women and girls. The Foundation’s statewide research on issues affecting women and girls provides decision-makers and lawmakers with critical data to inform policies, practices and programs in the state. Its advocacy, grantmaking and innovative programs support solutions that help Texas women and girls thrive. In addition, Texas Women’s Foundation is an acknowledged leader and advocate in the gender lens investing movement and has deployed 100% of its assets – endowments, operating investments and donor-advised funds – in a gendered impact portfolio that yields strong financial returns and measurable social benefits to women and girls. For more information, visit www.txwf.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram or donate now